Author: Parsa Salehi

Parsa Salehi Parsa Salehi (2 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Drexel University College of Medicine


Parsa attended Cornell University as an undergraduate, where he majored in Human Biology. He had a particular interest in nutrition, healthcare policy, near eastern studies, and human development while in Ithaca. He is finishing up his medical school years, as part of Drexel University College of Medicine's Class of 2017. He enjoys basketball (Go Mavs!), skiing, debate/public speaking, fitness, travel, nature, cooking, poetry, and spending time with friends/family.




Hierarchy in Medicine: Compromising Values for Honors

A ubiquitous hierarchy pervades all levels of medicine. Medical students are anchored firmly at the bottom of medicine’s social ladder, rendering them functionally powerless. Although students theoretically have a “voice”, their precarious position low down makes them apprehensive to use it. Students’ grades, evaluations and recommendations, etc.– which have real, tangible impacts, not only on students’ academics, but also their future careers and lives — are contingent on appeasing those higher up on the so-called social ladder.

Parsa Salehi Parsa Salehi (2 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Drexel University College of Medicine


Parsa attended Cornell University as an undergraduate, where he majored in Human Biology. He had a particular interest in nutrition, healthcare policy, near eastern studies, and human development while in Ithaca. He is finishing up his medical school years, as part of Drexel University College of Medicine's Class of 2017. He enjoys basketball (Go Mavs!), skiing, debate/public speaking, fitness, travel, nature, cooking, poetry, and spending time with friends/family.