Columns

Max Jordan Nguemeni Tiako Max Jordan Nguemeni Tiako (3 Posts)

Columnist

Yale School of Medicine


Max is a third-year medical student at the Yale School of Medicine, with a background in civil and environmental engineering, and bioengineering.

White Coat and a Hoodie

Attending Howard University gave Max a foundation for and continues to inform how he approaches issues related to injustice. Now in medical school, he has made it one of his focal interests to learn about and contribute to progress towards health equity, nationally and globally. Through this column, he will share stories on his experience as a Black man in medicine, and insights on topics of race, class, health equity, and medical education.




Everyone Needs A Coach

Michael Jordan had established himself as one of the best basketball players early in his career, but it was not until Phil Jackson’s arrival as coach that he won numerous championships … Similar to the role that coaching has in athletics, I believe coaching is crucial throughout medical school, residency and beyond as senior physicians.

Recency: A New Framework for Fairness and Inclusion in Portraiture at Academic Medical Centers and Beyond

As institutions of higher learning are becoming increasingly diverse, the portraiture that hangs in these institutions should reflect the bodies that inhabit their halls. Here, I argue that recency is particularly needed in academic medicine, and will propose some strategies for achieving it in our academic medical centers.

Neha Kumar (18 Posts)

Columnist

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine


Neha is a third year MD candidate at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. To combat the cold and snow in Cleveland, Neha spends her time napping, exploring art museums, and taking the local brunch world by storm, one sweet confection at a time. When she has saved up enough money, she plans to go on a world tour and visit every single capital of every single country.

Mind Your Mind

A very important but rarely discussed topic is that of mental health in medical practitioners, notably medical students. According to a study in the Student British Medical Journal, 30% of medical students report having a mental health condition—with a majority of 80% stating the level of available support was poor or only moderately adequate. This column was born from these alarming statistics and aims to stimulate conversation on mental health in medical students, from providing suggestions on how to maintain one’s mental health to discussing the taboo and stigma surrounding conversations on mental health in practitioners/students and how to eliminate it.