Columns

Mollika Hossain (2 Posts)

Columnist

Florida State University College of Medicine


Mollika Hossain is a third year medical student at Florida State University College of Medicine. She enjoys stuffing her face with dangerously spicy Thai food, watching junk reality television, and writing poetry for her creative blog. An optimist at heart, she often attempts to do all three simultaneously!

Mastering an MD with MDD: An Initiative to Destigmatize Mental Illness in Medicine

I am just a medical student who happens to suffer from complicated Major Depressive Disorder and General Anxiety Disorder. The statistics all say that medical students/physicians are more prone to mental illness, but not many of us come out and share our mental health issues candidly. This column emerged out of my need to voice for change. I see no shame in starting the conversation and opening up about my journey through medical school with mental illness. Through this column, I hope to reach out to my fellow students who are enduring similar struggles, demonstrating to them that they are not alone and that it is perfectly possible to be a successful physician even with mental illness. In addition, I would like to offer a unique perspective to those who cannot relate in order to create more understanding about each other within the medical field. The stigma surrounding mental illness in medicine may not have started with us, but it can certainly end with us if we collectively rise up, raise awareness and demand change. As a famous revolutionary once stated, “Be the change you wish to see in the world.” I wish to follow in his footsteps.




Robert Coles on Reading, Medicine and The Call of Stories: A Book Review

As a medical student deeply interested in education, books, and writing, I try to read widely, and am always looking for reading material at the intersection of these interests. Thus when a friend of mine described Robert Coles as a gifted writer, one who placed great emphasis on the value of stories to the practicing clinician, he seemed like the perfect fit. I had previously read some of his shorter pieces, but my friend suggested I read The Call of Stories: Teaching and the Moral Imagination.

Adventure #8: Singing in More Places Than the Shower

One thing I’ve always associated the holiday season with (besides lots of yummy food) is singing — anything and everything from Christmas caroling to hymns at church. I’ve never had a very good voice, but one thing I always noticed was that I enjoyed myself every time I sang. However, I always chalked it up to the situation rather than the act of singing itself.

A View on an Artist in Medicine

Perhaps one of the most unique aspects in the culture of medical school is the integrative class of students that survive together through the obstacles in this metamorphosis. Individually and as a collective whole, we trudge through the same curricular rigors, learning to balance life, work, and all that in between. Many of us form significant bonds with our fellow classmates, whether through celebration or suffering. Through our mutual bonding, what quickly becomes apparent to us is the diverse background and hidden talents that make each big family unique and multifaceted. Beyond our scientific acumen, some of us juggle side-hobbies as musicians, some as chefs, some as craftspersons, others as comedians — and the torrent of talent runs abundant.

Adventure #7: Arrow Struck True

Everyone loves Katniss Everdeen. What’s not to love about the strong, independent, bad-ass woman? Given that exams and Step 1 are looming closer and closer, I’ve been feeling less and less sure of myself and wishing that I could channel my inner Katniss Everdeen and emerge victorious against the Capitol–and by the Capitol, I mean exams). When sharing these thoughts with a friend, it occurred to me that I could step into Katniss’s shoes for a day by taking archery lessons. So, my friend and I gathered a group to see if any of us could hypothetically be the next winner of The Hunger Games.

A Third Year Opus — Chapter Three: The Tenant

Delirium is a bread-and-butter presentation. The differential writes itself — stroke, infection, intoxication, electrolyte imbalances, shock, organ failure. The intellectual exercise this invites was practically invented for medical students, even if the final diagnosis (dehydration secondary to gastroenteritis) and its treatment (fluids) were relatively mundane.

Hot Lights, Cold Steel: A Review of Residency

For most first-and second-year medical students, residency is only in their imagination, and it is not truly until the third and fourth years that it becomes something they can imagine very well. It is the mystical land of having ‘made it’: getting through medical school, having the title MD or DO finally applied to you, and being thrown head first into the clinical world.

Ajay Koti Ajay Koti (17 Posts)

Columnist and in-Training Staff Member

Morsani College of Medicine at the University of South Florida


Ajay is a pediatric resident and a Class of 2017 graduate of the SELECT MD program at the University of South Florida. He is passionate about delivering primary care to underserved populations—specifically, low-income and homeless patients in urban centers. Ajay will be specializing in pediatrics, with a particular interest in child maltreatment.

M.D. or Bust

Numerous studies have documented that medical students lose empathy during clinical years, becoming jaded and pessimistic. This has been linked not only to diminished enjoyment of our work, but also to worse patient outcomes. My goal is to sustain the humanistic values that drive so many of us to medicine, so that, instead of being quelled by cynicism, our idealism can be refined by wisdom.