Tag: flint water crisis

Valerie Grant Valerie Grant (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine

Valerie graduated from the University of Michigan in 2008 with a BS in Biochemistry. She joined the Neuroscience Training Program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and finished her MS in Neuroscience in 2011. She was a faculty member at St Ambrose Academy teaching science and math before matriculating at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine where she is now a member of the MD class of 2018. Her children will be 4 and 6 when she graduates.

In this Feb. 3, 2015 photo, Genetha Campbell carries free water being distributed at the Lincoln Park United Methodist Church in Flint, MI. Associated Press/Paul Sancya, used with permission under Creative Commons.

Ten Lessons from Flint: Speaking Up & Getting Results — Part 2 of 3

Researchers like Professor Marc Edwards and Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha were not the first people to speak up about the water crisis in Flint. In June of 2015, regional EPA employee Miguel A Del Toral, Regulations Manager of the Ground Water and Drinking Water Branch, issued an internal memorandum entitle “High Lead Levels in Flint, Michigan – Interim Report.” This document described the lack of corrosion control protocol and high lead levels. It was released to officials within the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Professor Edwards and Flint resident Lee Ann Walters, whose home water contained extremely high lead levels, as confirmed by city officials.

Residents of Flint spoke up for months before those in power listened. From flintwaterstudy.org, used with permission.

Ten Lessons from Flint: Training for Advocacy — Part 3 of 3

Exposing contaminated and corrosive water in Flint was necessary and life-saving, and the story garnered significant national attention. Yet not every situation calls for advocacy in such a public way. Advocacy for individual patients and patient safety is also crucial. Whether you’re advocating for an individual patient in a hospital or the public on the national stage, becoming an effective advocate requires practice and training. With the right training and understanding of the advocate’s tool kit, we can advocate for positive changes on behalf of individual patients and the public.

Kate Joyce Kate Joyce (5 Posts)

Contributing Writer and Outreach Coordinator Emeritus

Northeast Ohio Medical University-Cleveland State University

Kate is an M1 at NEOMED in Rootstown, Ohio and part of the CSU/NEOMED partnership. She is excited to have the opportunity to marry two of her passions--writing and health --with the team at in-Training. Prior to entering medical school, Kate had the opportunity to earn an MPH and work for several years with Children’s HealthWatch, a fantastic group that researches impacts of public policies on low-income families in pediatric primary care centers and emergency departments.

Between classes, she works as an EMT or on freelance film projects, practices amateur photography and gets lost in nature. She is particularly interested in physician advocacy, the role of narrative media in public health, urban community violence, nutrition, international health, early childhood education and ending cycles of poverty.