Tag: medical education

Ogaga Urhie Ogaga Urhie (3 Posts)

Writer-in-Training

West Virginia University School of Medicine


Ogaga is a medical student at West Virginia University and has completed his second year. He intends to pursue a residency in neurosurgery and intends to integrate clinical research into his practice. To this end, he is currently undergoing a Masters in Clinical and Translational Science (clinical research) with most of his research being in neurosurgery. He has been interested in the arts and humanities since high school and came to appreciate the poignant stories various forms of artwork tell during his university career. He enjoys observing all forms of art and actively write poetry (influenced by his love of Victorian literature). He came to realize that patients and clinicians may have their own stories to tell and that the arts and humanities can help all stakeholders better connect with stories of healthcare. In this light, he is currently involved in two projects that are aiming to use narrative medicine to improve patients' quality of life.




Mentor-Mentee Relationships in Medicine

The best mentor-mentee relationships I am a part of have allowed me to make mistakes while encouraging me and giving me targeted ways of doing better the next time around. They have also consisted of developing realistic goals and expectations. But, above all, they have taken what I bring to the table and helped elevate what is already there, not change it.

An Interview with Dr. Dustyn Williams and Jamie Fitch, Co-Founders of OnlineMedEd (Part 3)

When you leave medical school and go to your residency, what you realize is it’s a lot more than OnlineMedEd. No kidding — pelvic anatomy is a 20-minute video. Turns out there’s more to know than that. If you’re going to become a gynecologist who does surgery, you’re going to learn a hell of a lot more than I teach there.

Recency: A New Framework for Fairness and Inclusion in Portraiture at Academic Medical Centers and Beyond

As institutions of higher learning are becoming increasingly diverse, the portraiture that hangs in these institutions should reflect the bodies that inhabit their halls. Here, I argue that recency is particularly needed in academic medicine, and will propose some strategies for achieving it in our academic medical centers.

Nihaal Mehta (8 Posts)

Editor-in-Chief

Brown University Alpert Medical School


Nihaal Mehta is a member of the Class of 2020 at Brown University Alpert School of Medicine. Originally from Lexington, MA, he also attended Brown for college, graduating in 2014 with a degree in Health and Human Biology and subfocus in Global Health. Nihaal’s interests lie in medicine and its intersections: with health systems, policy, and the humanities. In college, he worked as a Writing Fellow, a Teaching Assistant for biology and public health courses, and assisted in the design of a course that examines controversies in medicine. Before returning to Brown for medical school, he spent a year working in consulting on health care business, strategy, and policy. He plans to specialize in Ophthalmology, and has conducted research focused on optical coherence tomography and retinal disease.