Tag: medical education

Ogaga Urhie Ogaga Urhie (2 Posts)

Writer-in-Training

West Virginia University School of Medicine


Ogaga is a medical student at West Virginia University and has completed his second year. He intends to pursue a residency in neurosurgery and intends to integrate clinical research into his practice. To this end, he is currently undergoing a Masters in Clinical and Translational Science (clinical research) with most of his research being in neurosurgery. He has been interested in the arts and humanities since high school and came to appreciate the poignant stories various forms of artwork tell during his university career. He enjoys observing all forms of art and actively write poetry (influenced by his love of Victorian literature). He came to realize that patients and clinicians may have their own stories to tell and that the arts and humanities can help all stakeholders better connect with stories of healthcare. In this light, he is currently involved in two projects that are aiming to use narrative medicine to improve patients' quality of life.




"The Simulation Center" (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) by IU School of Medicine

The Use of Simulations for Training Future Physicians

A patient in the intensive care unit (I.C.U.) suddenly develops respiratory distress and hypoxemia. Her lungs sound clear bilaterally. She is placed on supplemental oxygen via face-mask while a chest angiography is ordered to assess the possibility of a pulmonary embolism. Unfortunately, the patient’s oxygen saturation drops further. The nurses want to know what the next appropriate intervention is. But you can’t answer. You are tongue-tied. You shift your gaze nervously … Relax. This is …

Mentor-Mentee Relationships in Medicine

The best mentor-mentee relationships I am a part of have allowed me to make mistakes while encouraging me and giving me targeted ways of doing better the next time around. They have also consisted of developing realistic goals and expectations. But, above all, they have taken what I bring to the table and helped elevate what is already there, not change it.

An Interview with Dr. Dustyn Williams and Jamie Fitch, Co-Founders of OnlineMedEd (Part 3)

When you leave medical school and go to your residency, what you realize is it’s a lot more than OnlineMedEd. No kidding — pelvic anatomy is a 20-minute video. Turns out there’s more to know than that. If you’re going to become a gynecologist who does surgery, you’re going to learn a hell of a lot more than I teach there.

Recency: A New Framework for Fairness and Inclusion in Portraiture at Academic Medical Centers and Beyond

As institutions of higher learning are becoming increasingly diverse, the portraiture that hangs in these institutions should reflect the bodies that inhabit their halls. Here, I argue that recency is particularly needed in academic medicine, and will propose some strategies for achieving it in our academic medical centers.

Physicians as Leaders: The Need for a Novel Curriculum Addressing Health Care Reform

Nationally, our current medical education model fails to address the fundamental tenets of the U.S. health care system, health care policy, and business management. Despite the recent major shift in health care policy, medical schools have proved universally inept at equipping future doctors with the knowledge and tools they need to influence policy in their professional field and to thrive in their careers.

Parsa Salehi Parsa Salehi (3 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Yale University School of Medicine


Parsa attended Cornell University as an undergraduate, where he majored in Human Biology. He had a particular interest in nutrition, healthcare policy, near eastern studies, and human development while in Ithaca. He completed medical school as part of Drexel University College of Medicine's Class of 2017. He is currently an Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Resident at Yale University.