Tag: medical student advocacy

Rohit Abraham Rohit Abraham (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Michigan State University College of Human Medicine


Rohit Abraham is a 4th year MD/MPH student and Zuckerman Fellow at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He currently serves on the board of directors for the Association of Clinicians for the Underserved, Michigan State Medical Society, as well as the Genesee County Medical Society. See more at www.RohitAbraham.com




Regeneration

Certain events over the past few months and the recent election have revealed a lot of hurt and pain in our country. As future physicians, I believe we are called not only to care medically for our patients, but also to advocate for them. I do not know what the future may hold, but I do know that we can play our part in standing up for our communities and championing the rights of those who are marginalized. I hope we can strive to be medical students and physicians who are defined by empathetic care and healing.

Human Sex Trafficking and the Role of the Clinician

Major sporting events like the Olympics and the Super Bowl are often surrounded with excitement and drama. This year’s Olympics in Brazil is buzzing with talk of the Zika virus. The Super Bowl was fraught with drama surrounding Beyoncé’s half-time performance. It seems like everyone has something to say about these topics. But, one thing spectators don’t talk about is an unseen drama that often surrounds major sporting events: sex trafficking.

Why Black Lives Matter Ought to Matter to Medical Students: A Familiar Message Revisited

In December of 2014, one week after the non-indictment of Michael Brown, in-Training published an article entitled “A Lack of Care: Why Medical Students Should Focus on Ferguson.” In it, Jennifer Tsai argued that the systemic racism rampant in our law enforcement and criminal justice systems also permeates our health care system, affecting both access to care for black patients and the quality of care black patients receive. Lamenting that the medical community was largely absent from the Ferguson controversy, she cited startling statistics of disparities in health and health care as part of her call to action. In light of the events last week in Louisiana, Minnesota, and Texas, it’s time to revisit this message.

Gun Violence is a Disease That Needs to Be Studied: A Physician’s Calling?

As I write this article, 49 people have been confirmed dead after a mass shooting at a popular nightclub in Orlando, FL, with an additional 53 reported injured. In recent times, similar shootings have occurred with frightening regularity. In 2015 alone, we can recount San Bernadino, California; Colorado Springs, Colorado; Roseburg, Oregon; Chattanooga, Tennessee; and Charleston, North Carolina. People are being killed in unprecedented numbers, yet we have a poor understanding of the disease that is taking their lives. Gun violence is now a concerning public health issue and it begs the question: where are the patient advocates?

Learning to be an Advocate, One Day at a Time

Among my professor’s stories from Lima, the chicken dinner story haunts me most. It features two students from his time as a middle school teacher in one of Lima’s most dangerous outskirt neighborhoods. A young teacher working at a Fe y Alegria school in North Lima, my professor, Kyle, had promised to take them anywhere they desired for dinner in exchange for exam success. The students requested chicken, standard Peruvian celebratory fare.

Jocelyn Wu Jocelyn Wu (2 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Creighton School of Medicine


Jocelyn is a fast-talking swing dancer from Tacoma, Washington. She appreciates short lines at the post-office and fine point pens. She is 26 years old and a third year medical student at Creighton School of Medicine in Omaha, Nebraska.