Tag: medical student wellbeing

Michael Hernandez (2 Posts)

Contributing Writer

University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine


Hi! I am a fourth year medical student at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine. I am currently in the process of applying to psychiatry programs with the goal of going into child & adolescent psychiatry. To stay sane, I cook, write, and play with my 3 adorable cats.




Married in Medical School: Our Experience

Medical school can be an overwhelming journey for many students as the pace, quantity of content, and work hours far exceeds even the most prepared students’ expectations. The overall demand of medical school makes having a “normal life” very challenging; that is, the ability to attend happy hours or frequent social events, see local professional teams play or cultivate hobbies all become difficult to orchestrate between the endless pages of reading or practice UWorld questions.

Student Protests Reveal a Systemic Disease

As medical students, we recognize that bias in medicine is doubly damaging: it burdens our peers and it harms our patients. In the opening narratives we see both of these at play: in Micaela’s self-doubt and frustration, and in the intern’s judgment of their older, Latina patient. Such clinician bias has been increasingly shown to contribute to widespread health inequities.

Widening the Discussion of Mental Health in Medical School and Beyond

A fellow student writer recently wrote that she wondered if depression were “just part of life as a medical student.” One of her professors had given a lecture on depression asking students to “think of how many people we knew with the signs of depression listed on his lecture slide” — excluding medical students of course, “because you’ve all got some of these.” There is something so terribly and inherently wrong with that statement.

Introduction to in-Training Mental Health Week 2016: A Letter from the Editor-in-Chief

My medical school, Indiana University, is one of the largest in the country with over 300 students in each graduating class. Sadly, each year it seems we lose one of our classmates to suicide. The surprising part? These numbers might be lower than the national average. In the United States, approximately 300 to 400 physicians commit suicide each year. A 2009 study in Academic Medicine reported that 12 percent of medical students had major depression and nearly six percent experienced suicide ideation. To visualize these numbers, in my class alone, statistically, 18 students have experienced suicide ideation and approximately 36 have major depression.

Resilience in Medical Education: Defining Burnout and How Role Models Can Help

Medical school is a notoriously challenging experience during which students undergo tremendous personal change and professional growth. Though the stressors that come along with this are varied and unique to each student’s context and experience, they may be categorized within a few common themes. Harvard psychiatrist Raymond Laurie has previously described the concept of “role strain” with respect to negotiating relationships with their families, friends, partners, peers, attending physicians and patients. Additionally, with regard to students’ concept of themselves, individuals who have high achievement may be challenged in new ways both intellectually and emotionally.

From the Editors-in-Chief: Open Conversations for in-Training Mental Health Week

Back in April of this year, we came across an article published in JAMA Psychiatry that called to attention the poor state of mental health for many physicians-in-training. We were excited by the publication of this seminal piece, an opportunity for medical educators, students and institutions to have an earnest conversation about the ugly stain of burnout and suicide that tarnishes the healing profession.

Ajay Major, MD, MBA Ajay Major, MD, MBA (12 Posts)

Founder and Editor-in-Chief Emeritus

University of Colorado School of Medicine

My name is Ajay Major, a Class of 2016 graduate of Albany Medical College and an internal medicine resident at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

My journey into medical journalism and publishing began in April 2012 when I founded in-Training, the online magazine for medical students, and served as editor-in-chief for four years. I also founded in-House, the online magazine for residents and fellows, and The Palate, an online magazine for medical students at the intersection of nutrition and public health.

To support these publications, I founded Pager Publications, Inc., a 501c3 non-profit literary corporation that curates and supports peer-edited publications for the medical education community. In May 2016, Pager Publications, Inc. published its first print book: in-Training: Stories from Tomorrow's Physicians, a print compendium of over 100 articles written and edited by medical students on humanism, our real-life patients, and the challenges of being a physician-in-training

I am also a lover of all things science fiction and fantasy (Star Trek: Voyager is my favorite -- apologies to all you Picard fans), and I play classical piano and clarinet.