Tag: medical student wellbeing

Michael Appeadu (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Emory University School of Medicine


Michael Appeadu is a fourth year medical student at Emory University School of Medicine. He graduated from Dartmouth College in 2012, where he studied sociology and biology. Michael has served as president for Emory's chapter of Student National Medical Association, a group dedicated to addressing the needs of underserved populations and supporting underrepresented minority students. He enjoys thriller movies, ping pong, conversations with friends and family, traveling, and storytelling.




Paying it Forward: Top 5 Takeaways from Medical School So Far

Earlier this month, I watched my younger sister begin her medical school journey as she walked on stage in front of family members and peers to be officially “white-coated.” I had never been to another White Coat Ceremony since my own years ago. It was fascinating to observe it from my now-more-seasoned fourth-year medical student eyes — especially at another institution.

The Upside of Depression: An Optimistic Medical Student’s Journey to Find the Silver Lining with an Oxymoron

Depression — the term itself certainly does well to evoke a feeling of doom and negativity. On an everyday basis, we often associate feelings such as the disappointment from a poor test score, the physical exhaustion incurred from a stressful day, and even the unexpected blight of cloudy grey skies, with depression.

Married in Medical School: Our Experience

Medical school can be an overwhelming journey for many students as the pace, quantity of content, and work hours far exceeds even the most prepared students’ expectations. The overall demand of medical school makes having a “normal life” very challenging; that is, the ability to attend happy hours or frequent social events, see local professional teams play or cultivate hobbies all become difficult to orchestrate between the endless pages of reading or practice UWorld questions.

Student Protests Reveal a Systemic Disease

As medical students, we recognize that bias in medicine is doubly damaging: it burdens our peers and it harms our patients. In the opening narratives we see both of these at play: in Micaela’s self-doubt and frustration, and in the intern’s judgment of their older, Latina patient. Such clinician bias has been increasingly shown to contribute to widespread health inequities.

Widening the Discussion of Mental Health in Medical School and Beyond

A fellow student writer recently wrote that she wondered if depression were “just part of life as a medical student.” One of her professors had given a lecture on depression asking students to “think of how many people we knew with the signs of depression listed on his lecture slide” — excluding medical students of course, “because you’ve all got some of these.” There is something so terribly and inherently wrong with that statement.

Kate Bock Kate Bock (5 Posts)

Columnist

A Chicago Medical School


Kate Bock has been writing since she was five years old. She considers "DW Goes to the Beach" to be her finest accomplishment, rendered in marker, green construction paper, and stickers. She studied fiction writing at Northwestern University, where she led a small group of poets called The Slam Society. She studies medicine as an M3 at a Chicago medical school.

Review of Systems

Medical students’ place in the hierarchy of medicine means we are routinely restricted in what we can (or should) say. That taboo list includes our own transformation–despite being only one of thousands impacted by medical education, all too often we are left alone to process how it changes us. Review of Systems is a series of down-to-earth slam poems by Kate Bock, putting words to the unspoken process not just of learning medicine, but of becoming a doctor.