Tag: organ donation

Matthew Trifan (3 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Temple University School of Medicine

Matt Trifan is a Class of 2017 student at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple. He hails from a family of immigrant physicians and is interested in practicing Emergency Medicine. In his free time, he reads, writes, travels, and never misses a chance for brunch. He owes his life philosophy to Albert Camus and Adventure Time.

The Silver Lining

We stood in the shadows, a staggered line of nurses, students and surgeons in matching blue scrubs and masks. It was the middle of the night. Our tired bodies sagged against the walls, our bloodshot eyes dancing between the clock above and the gasping life below. A young man was dying in the operating room. He lay on the cutting table with his arms splayed wide, like a martyred saint stretched upon the cross.

A Comprehensive Strategy to Increase Organ Donation

Over 120,000 adults and children are waiting for an organ in the United States, and another patient needing an organ is added to the transplant list every ten minutes. On average, about 20 Americans die every day from the lack of available organs for transplant. Specific to kidney transplant, it has been estimated that by 2015, over 700,000 Americans will have end stage renal disease and over 26 million will have some form of chronic kidney disease.

Organ Donation: To Opt In Or Opt Out

Organ shortage is a serious problem in the United States. About 20,000 organ transplants occur every year in the U.S., and 116,689 Americans are currently on a waiting list for an organ, with kidneys being the most needed. The obesity epidemic is contributing to the shortage; a quarter of prospective donors are too obese to donate their kidneys. People typically wait 3-5 years for an organ, and thousands die every year (an average of 18 …

Ryan Denu Ryan Denu (7 Posts)

Contributing Writer

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

Ryan is a Class of 2019 MD/PhD student at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. He graduated in May 2012 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison with a BS in molecular biology. He enjoys thinking and writing about health care policy and bioethics, and is also an avid tennis player, instructor, coach, umpire, and fan.