Tag: standardized patient

Nita Chen Nita Chen (32 Posts)

Medical Student Editor and in-Training Staff Member

Albany Medical College

Nita Chen is a Class of 2017 medical student at Albany Medical College. To become cultural, she spent her early educational years in Taiwan and thoroughly enjoyed wonderful Taiwanese food and milk tea, thus ruining her appetite for the rest of her life in the United States. Aside from her neuroscience and cognitive science majors during her undergraduate career, she holed herself up in her room writing silly fictional stories, doodling, and playing the piano. Or she could be found spazzing out like a gigantic science nerd in various laboratories. Now she just holes up in her room to study most of the time.

Playing the Part

He and I are early, and we are the only ones in the room. I sit in an office chair — the kind that swivels — around a long, industrial-looking table with another ten chairs, and I watch him as he nods, his eyes closed, to music playing through his headphones.

Talking Dirty

Barely into my second year of medical school, I already have a reputation — I love asking the uncomfortable stuff. Social history, sex, drugs, alcohol, I want to know it all. At first, it was just because that section randomly fell on me during small group sessions or standardized patient encounters. Then, I began to volunteer, or be volunteered. “Mariya loves the dirt,” my classmates say. Without saying, I always approach this section of the …

Communication Breakdown: The Art in Medicine

I walk around, wide-eyed yet confused. It seems so different. I always thought I was too objective for my art friends and too subjective for my science friends. But was that really an accurate reflection of my own personality? Medicine is about reductionism, objectivity and straightforwardness. In medical school, I’m learning a method of communication in which empathy is taught as a route to finding out more about a patient; it’s conveniently called the patient-centered …

I Don’t Know How to Tell You This…

“My rheumatologist was the one who told me I have cancer because for nine months we thought my back pain was due to a type of arthritis. He felt really bad about it and when he called me to tell me the diagnosis, he started crying on the phone.” A student in my second-year medical school class says this when we are in the big lecture hall for a class presentation on how to give …

SP to MD: My Alternate Route to Medical School

It was just supposed to be a temporary job. At least that was what I envisioned when I started my position as a standardized patient at Albany Medical College. Four months earlier, I graduated a semester early from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Drama. When I applied to be an standardized patient (SP), I was searching for a way to take my acting career to the next level. …

Well, I Did a Digital Rectal Exam

“The patient, today, is Stephen,” revealed Mister the patient, his lips curled up in a mischievous smile. He was already wearing a hospital gown when I entered the physical exam room with two of my classmates. “But it’s not the name that’s written on the schedule. I’ve got Luke here,” my classmate noticed. When I heard Mister laughing that cheerfully, I knew that this clinical skills session would be different. Really different. It was not …

Nina Nguyen Nina Nguyen (1 Posts)

Managing Editor

University of Sherbrooke Faculty of Medicine

Nina Nguyen is a Class of 2016 student at the University of Sherbrooke Faculty of Medicine in Sherbrooke, Canada. Currently a blogger for her institution and a content editor of the Publications Support Division of the International Federation of Medical Students' Association, she has a strong interest in medical journalism and in medical humanities. As an aspiring physician-writer who wishes to commit to the field of public health, she enjoys advocating for reproductive health and rights and understanding the power of media in the doctor-patient relationship. Find her on Twitter at @meimeian, where she can tweet in 5, maybe 6, languages.