Doctor’s Orders

Doctor’s Orders is our section for residents and physicians to give wisdom and advice to medical students.

Lisa Moore Lisa Moore (3 Posts)

Contributing Writer Emeritus

Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine


Lisa grew up in Houston, Texas, went to college in the lovely town of Denton, and moved to Chicago to begin medical school in 2010. She is planning on a career in family medicine. Her academic interests include integrative medicine, mindfulness, nutrition and women's health. Her personal interests include poetry, cooking, yoga, and seeking out all the ways these areas of life overlap.




To Me, Ten Years Ago, by T. N. Diem Vu, MD

Ten years ago, I stepped onto the grounds of my medical school for the first time. I remember there was so much anxiety — I was anxious to become a student doctor, anxious to choose a specialty, anxious about my own insecurities around my impressive and brilliant classmates. I wish I could go back in time and sit down with my younger self at my favorite coffee shop. I’d treat her to a hot matcha latte with honey and vanilla (it’s going to change her life) and tell her everything is going to be okay.

Couples Matching for the Uncommitted

After four years of intensive studying, two years with long hours in the hospital and three years of dating, we made the decision to apply to dermatology and plastic surgery. Recognizing the competitive nature of both of these fields, we quickly realized that matching together may not be feasible. We wanted to take each other into account in the process without either one of us making a large sacrifice in the quality of our training program to be together. Open communication and transparency were critical for us throughout the process. 

Lacey Castellano, MD (1 Posts)

Resident Physician Guest Writer

Virginia Commonwealth University Pediatrics Residency


I am a third year pediatric resident at the Children's Hospital of Richmond in Virginia. I am going into pediatric hospital medicine. I have a special interest in making medicine more empathetic and humanistic, for both our patients and ourselves.