Opinions

Lewis Wong Lewis Wong (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences


Lewis is a fourth year medical student at University at Buffalo Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences in Buffalo, NY Class of 2021. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees in music from graduated from the Eastman School of Music and the Juilliard School. He enjoys ballroom dancing, cooking, and skiing in his free time. After graduating medical school, Lewis would like to pursue a career in primary care for underserved communities.




Medical Students Do Not Owe You Their Trauma

Interviewers who ask these questions in a professional setting typically consider these issues to be academic — purely topics for discussion that might provide useful insight into the way the applicant views the world. But for applicants who have been affected, these issues are not merely academic and their discussion can invoke significant emotional turmoil. So before we continue to tacitly accept this shift in interviewing, it is important to consider its purpose and impact on those being interviewed.

It’s Time to Find a Better Way to Test Soon-To-Be Doctors

In a typical year, medical students have to pass this one final patient actor bonanza before they can become doctors. Like all other USMLE exams, Step 2 CS is eight hours long. However, this is the only Step exam that isn’t administered on a computer; rather, it’s offered at just five centers in the country, located in Atlanta, Chicago, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles.

Emergence or Submersion? Productivity During COVID-19

It feels preemptive to discuss emergence while sitting in the living room where I’ve spent 15 hours a day for the past month — bradycardic afternoons mirroring the day prior. Yet each day the sun emerges, and we along with it, venturing out onto balconies and porches. As medical students, we take our pro re nata walks and remember to cross the street so our paths don’t intersect those of our neighbors.

Embracing Alphabet Soup: The Importance of Dual-Degree Programs in Medical Education and Health Care

As medical students, we marvel at the endless combinations of letters often embroidered on white coats representing physicians’ degrees and association affiliations: MD, MBBS, DO, PhD, MSc, MBA, MPH, MPP, MS, MTR, JD, MSHP and so on. This “alphabet soup” represents the important diversity that exists in our profession.

Silver Lining

The world is quarantined, but we have learned to be human again. Rather than tirelessly working or studying, we are forced to engage with one another in meaningful ways. We find novel alternatives to maintain relationships with those who mean the most to us during this daunting time with no foreseeable end.

Pranav Aurora (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University


Pranav is a fourth-year medical student at the Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University in Providence, RI class of 2020. In 2014, he graduated from the University of Virginia with a Bachelor of Science in engineering science. He enjoys cultivating his South Asian roots and organizing with friends to build a world free from prisons, borders, and capitalism. He is inspired by Frantz Fanon and BR Ambedkar. After graduating medical school, Pranav will join SUNY Downstate in Brooklyn, NY for his residency in psychiatry.