Author: Ronald Sahyouni

Ronald Sahyouni Ronald Sahyouni (2 Posts)

Contributing Writer

University of California, Irvine School of Medicine


Ron is a medical student at the UC Irvine School of Medicine. He is interested in regenerative medicine, and in particular, the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases with stem cells. He graduated from UC Berkeley with a double major in neurobiology and psychology, and has been interested in exploring how the brain can regenerate itself, and how new therapeutic techniques, such as intraventricular stem cell transplantations can enhance the brain's ability to heal itself.




Medical Tourism: The Ethics of the Exploitation of a Vulnerable Patient Population for Financial Gain

In times of medical ailment, individuals desperately seek medical attention – in particular, a cure or treatment to alleviate their illness. In these times of need, patients turn towards physicians for a diagnosis and effective treatment plan, relying on the latest technologies and therapeutic modalities to jumpstart a return to a normal lifestyle. However, what happens when there is no treatment, no cure and no therapy? When modern medicine no longer has anything to offer, …

Tactics for Efficient Learning in Med School and the Underlying Neurobiology

The Neurobiology of Learning With residencies becoming increasingly competitive, medical students today find themselves often juggling far more than simply staying on top of their course load. Students are getting involved in more research, mentorship, volunteering and outreach, leaving them with little time to study and master material outside of class. Furthermore, schools are placing a greater emphasis on small-group learning, podcasts and flipped classroom paradigms that put an even greater onus on students to …

Ronald Sahyouni Ronald Sahyouni (2 Posts)

Contributing Writer

University of California, Irvine School of Medicine


Ron is a medical student at the UC Irvine School of Medicine. He is interested in regenerative medicine, and in particular, the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases with stem cells. He graduated from UC Berkeley with a double major in neurobiology and psychology, and has been interested in exploring how the brain can regenerate itself, and how new therapeutic techniques, such as intraventricular stem cell transplantations can enhance the brain's ability to heal itself.