Tag: medical ethics

George Tsourdinis George Tsourdinis (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

University of Illinois College of Medicine in Peoria


George is a third year medical student at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in Peoria, IL class of 2021. In 2017, he graduated from the University of Chicago with a Bachelor of Arts in biological sciences with honors and a minor in the History, Philosophy, and Social Studies of Science and Medicine. He enjoys hiking, traveling, and traditional Hellenic folk dancing in his free time. After graduating medical school, George would like to pursue a career in Internal Medicine.




Stepping Beyond the Border: Reflections of a Medical Student on an International Elective Experience

Outside apartment 13C the street is empty. It is early in the morning, and yet sounds echo from the metal shop beside the lake, roosters crow, and the children upstairs patter back and forth across the tiles. I roll up my yoga mat, shaking dead cockroaches from its rubbery bottom. Through the grated windows I catch a glimpse of Lake Victoria, shimmering out from the cluttered shore of shanties and deconstructed docks to eventually blend with the blue of the morning sky.

Medicine Has a Problem with Racism

With the future of the Affordable Care Act uncertain under President Trump, many Americans are left worrying how they will manage without health care. The Americans who must shoulder this burden are disproportionately people of color. It should come as no surprise to those familiar with the history of health care in this country that once again our system, purportedly built to protect and promote health, is systematically ignoring the right to health care for communities of color.

Hierarchy in Medicine: Compromising Values for Honors

A ubiquitous hierarchy pervades all levels of medicine. Medical students are anchored firmly at the bottom of medicine’s social ladder, rendering them functionally powerless. Although students theoretically have a “voice”, their precarious position low down makes them apprehensive to use it. Students’ grades, evaluations and recommendations, etc.– which have real, tangible impacts, not only on students’ academics, but also their future careers and lives — are contingent on appeasing those higher up on the so-called social ladder.

Parsa Salehi Parsa Salehi (3 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Yale University School of Medicine


Parsa attended Cornell University as an undergraduate, where he majored in Human Biology. He had a particular interest in nutrition, healthcare policy, near eastern studies, and human development while in Ithaca. He completed medical school as part of Drexel University College of Medicine's Class of 2017. He is currently an Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Resident at Yale University.