Tag: medical student advocacy

Aida Haddad, MDiv Aida Haddad, MDiv (2 Posts)

Medical Student Editor

Indiana University School of Medicine


Aida is a second-year medical student at Indiana University School of Medicine. Prior to medical school, Aida earned her Bachelor of Science in environmental science from Indiana University Bloomington and a Master of Divinity from Princeton Theological Seminary. In June 2018, she walked from Louisville, Kentucky to St. Louis, Missouri to witness to the forced migration of climate change refugees and to advocate for her church's divestment from fossil fuels. Aida feels called to work at the intersection of medicine, anti-racism, & environmental justice.




Regeneration

Certain events over the past few months and the recent election have revealed a lot of hurt and pain in our country. As future physicians, I believe we are called not only to care medically for our patients, but also to advocate for them. I do not know what the future may hold, but I do know that we can play our part in standing up for our communities and championing the rights of those who are marginalized. I hope we can strive to be medical students and physicians who are defined by empathetic care and healing.

Human Sex Trafficking and the Role of the Clinician

Major sporting events like the Olympics and the Super Bowl are often surrounded with excitement and drama. This year’s Olympics in Brazil is buzzing with talk of the Zika virus. The Super Bowl was fraught with drama surrounding Beyoncé’s half-time performance. It seems like everyone has something to say about these topics. But, one thing spectators don’t talk about is an unseen drama that often surrounds major sporting events: sex trafficking.

Why Black Lives Matter Ought to Matter to Medical Students: A Familiar Message Revisited

In December of 2014, one week after the non-indictment of Michael Brown, in-Training published an article entitled “A Lack of Care: Why Medical Students Should Focus on Ferguson.” In it, Jennifer Tsai argued that the systemic racism rampant in our law enforcement and criminal justice systems also permeates our health care system, affecting both access to care for black patients and the quality of care black patients receive. Lamenting that the medical community was largely absent from the Ferguson controversy, she cited startling statistics of disparities in health and health care as part of her call to action. In light of the events last week in Louisiana, Minnesota, and Texas, it’s time to revisit this message.

Suhas Gondi Suhas Gondi (1 Posts)

Pre-Medical Guest Writer

Washington University in St. Louis


Suhas Gondi is a pre-medical student at Washington University in St. Louis (Class of 2017). He is pursuing a Bachelor's degree in Biology with a Neuroscience focus alongside minors in Economics and Healthcare Management. In addition to becoming a physician, he is interested in the systemic problems in American health care (e.g. cost, access, quality) and how we can use innovation and policy initiatives to solve them. A local of the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, he hopes to pursue leadership in public service at the intersection of government and health care.