Tag: medical student advocacy

Rohan Patel (3 Posts)

Contributing Writer

American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine


Rohan is a fourth year medical student at the American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine. Upon graduating, he plans on pursuing anesthesiology, while continuing to focus on global health. His research interests encompass global perioperative health, social medicine, medical education, and quality control and safety. He graduated from the University of Illinois at Chicago with a Bachelor's of Science in biochemistry with a minor concentration in psychology. He enjoys traveling and exploring new languages and cultures, especially in Asia.

The Silver Lining

From the outside, medicine is a grand profession – physicians and trainees work together to help those that are in need while saving lives. However, every day we are faced with darkness that does not get shown to outsiders. How we deal with these obstacles truly shapes our experiences within this profession, often leading to physician burnout. This column will focus on some of Rohan’s personal experiences facing the dark sides of medicine, while shedding light on how one can overcome these challenges, as there is always a silver lining through all the darkness.




Yes, Doctor

Two years of intense studying should have culminated in a feeling of strength. I ended my second year of medical school thinking I was now prepared to do anything. I was excited to be a problem-solver, armed with the mental acuity to recognize diseases from A to Z, ready to proceed with the next step in my clinical training. Now, in my third year, it is finally time to act like a real doctor. But our superiors treat us like their personal assistants.

It’s Time to Find a Better Way to Test Soon-To-Be Doctors

In a typical year, medical students have to pass this one final patient actor bonanza before they can become doctors. Like all other USMLE exams, Step 2 CS is eight hours long. However, this is the only Step exam that isn’t administered on a computer; rather, it’s offered at just five centers in the country, located in Atlanta, Chicago, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles.

The Role of Third-Year Medical Students During the COVID-19 Pandemic

On March 17, 2020, the American Association of Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) jointly issued a statement supporting “medical schools in placing, at minimum, a two-week suspension on their medical students’ participation in any activities that involve patient contact.” The joint recommendation leaves thousands of third-year medical students, who will soon enter into their final year of school, contemplating their role in the face of this evolving pandemic.

The Story of the American Medical Association’s New Policy on Children with Incarcerated Parents

The United States is the most heavily incarcerated country in the developed world, and with that comes many secondary consequences, including children growing up with incarcerated parents. Although efforts have been made to mitigate the harm associated with having an incarcerated parent, few are focused on meeting the direct health needs of these children through preventative health care.

Faith Crittenden Faith Crittenden (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

University of Connecticut School of Medicine


Faith Crittenden, a rising fourth-year medical student at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine and a Masters of Public Health student at Yale School of Public Health with a concentration in Health Policy in Hartford, CT Class of 2021, 2020 respectfully. In 2014, she graduated from the University of Connecticut with a Bachelor of Science in chemistry, minor in molecular and cell biology with honors. She is also a 2010 Gates Millenium Scholar. She enjoys cooking, spending time with family, and traveling in her free time. After graduating from medical school, Faith would like to pursue a career in Pediatrics.