Tag: technology

Leslie Matthews Leslie Matthews (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer Emeritus

West Virginia University School of Medicine


Leslie Matthews is originally from Hampden, Maine, and graduated from the University of Connecticut in 2009 with a doctorate in pharmacy. She is now a member of the Class of 2016 at the West Virginia University School of Medicine. She keeps herself entertained year round with New England sports, as she is a die-hard Boston Red Sox, New England Patriots, and UConn Huskies fan!




Ultrasound Technology: Anatomy and Pathology Education Come to Life at WVU

For students at West Virginia University School of Medicine, studying anatomy now consists of more than just furiously comparing textbook images to a cadaver. In addition to their traditional dissection-based coursework, they also learn anatomical structures from a living patient using ultrasound technology. Pioneered by Dr. Joseph Minardi, director of the emergency ultrasound fellowship at the WVU School of Medicine, the MD curriculum has begun integrating ultrasound education into all four years of its program. …

Baseball, Blue Buttons, and Legitimately Beautiful Health Records: An Interview with Adam Wong at the ONC for Health IT

Adam Wong works at the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, all of which, thankfully, can be abbreviated: ONC for Health IT.  The development of health IT — which includes everything from electronic medical records to smartphone apps — is at its best a populist project, involving techies, patients, students and health care professionals. I spoke with Adam about some of the recent developments in health IT and how medical students can …

Apps for Medical Students on the Go

Advances in technology have not only dramatically changed health care, but have also changed the way we learn medicine. Gone are the days of carrying clunky textbooks. You can also put away your six different highlighters. Why? Because technology has become your new best friend. Having a smartphone—or better, a tablet—on hand has become an especially useful tool for navigating your studies. Here is a guide to some of the apps that I have found …

Doctor versus Algorithm: Which Would You Trust?

If your doctor and an algorithm arrived at two different diagnoses, which would you trust?  Of course, it depends on the specific context but this question opens a much needed discussion about a transformative process occurring in medicine: computers are beginning to perform tasks of physicians.  While modern medicine utilizes medical technology primarily as an aid for physicians, future technology may afford diagnostic capability that rivals that of humans. The question is, in what capacity …

MERCI Device: Revolutionary Treatment of Acute Stroke

Introduction to mechanical thrombectomy The progress of clinical medicine lies within the purview of translational research, for if change is constant through time, then normalcy is backwardness. Dr. Y. Pierre Gobin of Weill Cornell Medical College understood this axiom in 1995 when he began developing the first mechanical thrombectomy device, now FDA-approved, for treatment of acute stroke. The model for stroke treatment remains at the mercy of time. Acute stroke is a heart attack of …

New Innovations in Medical Imaging Technology: Live from RSNA

The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting convened in Chicago this year with over 60,000 attendees. Yes, sixty thousand attendees. Physicians and medical students of all clinical specialties were joined by technologists, scientists, engineers, researchers, business personnel and many other professionals to network, enhance their educations, hone clinical skills and share cutting-edge research. A major hallmark of the RSNA conference is participation by the imaging technology industry. Diagnostic radiology and the imaging industry …

No More Paper Syllabi: iPads in Every Pocket at Rush

When first-year medical students at Rush Medical College sat down to take their cell and molecular biology block exam this past September, they were not handed stacks of stapled paper. Rather, the students received a single sheet of paper with instructions on taking the exam on their iPads. This change, however, did not catch any student off guard. At the beginning of this academic year, Rush Medical College joined the ranks of other medical schools …

AMA Med Ed Conference: A Broad Vision for the Narrowing of Medical Education

On October 4 – 5, 2013, the American Medical Association hosted the “Accelerating Change in Medical Education Conference” in Chicago, IL., bringing together leaders in the realm of medical education for discussions aimed at “closing the gap between current physician training and the needs of our evolving health care system.” In attendance were two in-Training editors, Emily Lu and Jarna Shah, who reported on the conference and offer their in-depth medical student perspectives on the …

Zero Bars

In this day and time, the primary method of communication revolves around social media and technology. Phones, pagers, computers and tablets have overtaken the “snail mail” of a bygone era. No matter what remote corner of the planet you inhabit, you have the ability to stay connected with your loved ones and personal interests. In our careers, we have come to realize that multitasking, especially through web-related technology, is the most productive usage of our …

More Than a Number: The Patient’s Story

Though I am currently a second year student at University of Vermont, I actually started medical school back in the ’80s in an ancient and venerable school in England, granted the royal seal by Henry VIII. Even just twenty-five or so years ago, the nurses still wore uniforms not significantly different from that worn by Florence Nightingale herself, and they kept their heads bowed and eyes demurely averted on ward rounds. I remember that there …

Peter Wingfield (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer Emeritus

University of Vermont College of Medicine


Peter Wingfield is in the Class of 2015 at the University of Vermont College of Medicine after more than two decades as an actor in the UK, Europe and North America.