Latest entries

The Weight of Your Judgments: Part I

Let’s pretend that you are a patient going into a new clinic for a doctor’s appointment. You are just getting a basic check-up to make sure you are still in good shape. As you are waiting for the doctor, what kinds of thoughts go through your mind? “I hope that everything is okay with me....
Medical Illustration: Shadowing an Artist in Medical School

Medical Illustration: Shadowing an Artist in Medical School

Art has been one of my passions ever since I could hold a pencil — an important outlet for expression, relaxation and reflection. However, I never found an intersection between art and medicine until I discovered medical illustration in college. This is the field in which artists take medical school classes alongside medical students to...
Gab

Gab

How can doctors-in-training put narrative medicine into practice? Gab, a third-year medical student in Pittsburgh planning to pursue internal medicine and pediatrics, discovered narrative medicine as an undergraduate majoring in English literature. She describes how engagement with medical humanities not only facilitates deeper patient relationships but also provides a vital means of self-care.

Poor Communication in Multidisciplinary Teams Harms Patient Safety: An Experience on the Wards

Location: Surgery inpatient floor Time: 6:00 a.m. Surgery morning rounds began: “Ms. A, your MRI shows you have colorectal cancer, so we plan to take you to the OR for surgery tomorrow. Alright, see you later,” said my surgery attending, who rushed out of Ms. A’s room right after he abruptly dropped this shocking news....
Keep Calm and Carry on the Interview Trail

Keep Calm and Carry on the Interview Trail

Buckle up — the interview trail for residency is a bumpy ride. It is time consuming, costly and stressful. There are things you should know beforehand so it won’t be so overwhelming. First things first, submit your ERAS application. It’s crickets after that. Then, a barrage of emails come soliciting you for an interview spot....

“The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down”: The Making of a Silver Lining in Epilepsy

Imagine an active neuron in the temporal lobe of the brain. This neuron receives a message through its dendrites and passes it to other neurons via its axons. This is the basic process of cell signaling. It shows the role of neurons and, more importantly, how neuronal disorders develop. Now imagine the neuron becomes overwhelmed...

Doctor Dad: A Husband and Father of Three in Med School

How do you find a balance in medical school? “There is no balance,” she said. This was not what I wanted to hear. We were talking about remaining competitive in medical school without giving up a social life. This administrator is an MD and has a PhD in education; she knows what she’s saying. She...

A Health Care System Alternative in the United States

“Drain commissioner! What the heck is a drain commissioner? And why do the drains need a commissioner?” I had recently moved to a rural county in the United States to work as a physical therapist, and as I read through the advertisements in the local paper for electoral offices, this one particularly intrigued me. As...
“It Takes Two Hands Clapping to Make a Noise”

“It Takes Two Hands Clapping to Make a Noise”

Ever since my siblings and I were in elementary school, my mother’s pearls have been circulating in our minds. For a while I may have thought there were no new pearls to be shared, but my mom continues to surprise us with hidden gems of wealth, right at the moments we happen to need them....
Chirurgia: The Mythical Practice

Chirurgia: The Mythical Practice

Maybe it’s the early mornings, maybe it’s the sleep deprivation, or perhaps it’s an early sign of caffeine intoxication, but a certain mythical feeling hits me when I walk into the OR. Not that I’m much of a spiritual person, but there’s just a whole hushed reverence that takes place. It’s a special “hallowed” space....
Do They Teach Fear in Medical School?

Do They Teach Fear in Medical School?

Room One Wendy Smith had thinning hair, penciled-in eyebrows, and a frame so thin that you could see, in painstaking detail, bluish-grey veins emanating from beneath her pale skin. Cancer had taken so much from her that she almost didn’t look human. But the feeling in the room was extremely human. Fear — palpable fear....

Ultrasound Technology: Anatomy and Pathology Education Come to Life at WVU

For students at West Virginia University School of Medicine, studying anatomy now consists of more than just furiously comparing textbook images to a cadaver. In addition to their traditional dissection-based coursework, they also learn anatomical structures from a living patient using ultrasound technology. Pioneered by Dr. Joseph Minardi, director of the emergency ultrasound fellowship at...
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