Doctor’s Orders

Doctor’s Orders is our section for residents and physicians to give wisdom and advice to medical students.

Matthew Bloom, DO Matthew Bloom, DO (2 Posts)

Physician Guest Writer

LSU Health Sciences Center New Orleans

Matthew Bloom, DO is Co-founder of Docs of Tomorrow.

dr bloom

How We Should Treat Failure, by Matthew Bloom, DO

How we respond to failure says a lot about who we are. In business, failure is often seen as a good thing. World-famous motivation speaker Tony Robbins likes to say, “You’re either winning, or learning.” He replaces the word losing with learning. We learn from our mistakes when we fail. Failing allows us to move forward in life, to grow into something better. Why is failure treated so differently in medicine?

sagar patel md

Applying to Residency is Overwhelming, Let’s Start with the Basics, by Sagar Patel, MD

You’re almost through with med school—the exams, the lectures, the rotations—but here’s where things get really real. Now it’s time to apply for residency. Don’t take your foot off the gas pedal yet, though. Residency applications are just as nuanced as medical school applications. They require plenty of preparation and attention to detail to ensure you have a successful match. A key difference, however, is that applicants and residencies are both trying to find an appropriate fit with each other.


Entrepreneurship in Medical School, by Stuart Maitland, MBBS, MSc

How do you define an entrepreneur? You might have visions of bleary-eyed university students hunched over laptops in the dark, coding the next Facebook or of businesspeople starting a new chain of restaurants. As an entrepreneur, the only definition I’ve been able to relate to comes from Eric Ries, writer of Lean Startup: “someone who creates a new product or service under conditions of extreme uncertainty.”

dr bloom

Can Doctors Be the Next Big Startup? by Matthew Bloom, DO

Everyone has heard of startups. For many of us, the term “startup” is a reference to technology companies in Silicon Valley. Companies like Google and Apple for example. These companies are so well-known to us because their products and services have and continue to significantly shape and define the world we live in today, from how we purchase almost everything we buy to how we communicate with almost everyone we know. But startups seem to have become more than just providers of goods and services — they’ve become lore of our capitalistic society: a standard for what it means to be truly successful.

Dr. Sahil Munjal

Breaking Bad News: A Side of Medicine That Is Not Easy, by Sahil Munjal, MD

Have you ever had a sinking feeling in your stomach when you are about to tell something to a patient or family member that might change their life forever? I had that feeling before speaking to the wife of my patient, Mr. Smith. It had only been one day since Mr. Smith was first admitted to the inpatient unit but regardless of how long the interaction is with a patient and their loved ones, some news is always difficult to deliver.


Things To Do To Shine on Your Anesthesia Clerkship, by Daniel Orlovich, MD, PharmD

You see, when starting your anesthesiology clerkship it feels as if you are learning a completely new skillset and knowledge base. Of course you are drawing on common principles in physiology, pharmacology, and anatomy. But how they play out, and how you apply those concepts, are fresh. Here are some tips to maximize your learning, assist your resident and really start to appreciate the field.

konstantin karmazin

Lessons for Student Doctrepreneurs: How to Survive (and Thrive) as an Entrepreneurial Medical Student, by Konstantin Karmazin, MD

The start of medical school is an exciting point in every student’s path toward finally becoming a physician. While you should be spending the majority of your day learning and part of each day marveling in the uniqueness of human anatomy and physiology, it is important for us to remain aware of the barriers to care that exist within the systems we train, and eventually practice in. But now more than ever, being a medical student with a penchant for innovation and entrepreneurship can lead to opportunities to create real change and impact real patients.

blm_ommo yamamoto

I Am a Brand New Intern, and This Is How I Show Solidarity with Black Lives Matter, by Katharine Lawrence, MD

Last week marked my first week as a doctor. Like thousands of my colleagues, I began intern year with a combination of enthusiasm and dread. On my first day of clinic, I woke well before dawn, full of nervous energy. I collected my precious intern paraphernalia — my stethoscope, my Pocket Medicine guide, and my crisp long white coat. I filled the pockets of my new uniform, smoothed the hems, and, as a finishing touch, began applying the pins I wore throughout medical school to the collar.

john kim, do

Why Reading (Still) Matters in Medicine, by John Kim, DO

The road to medical school mostly requires good grades in the hard sciences, high entrance exam scores, volunteering, and other quality extracurricular experiences. Once in medical school, the curriculum is a rollercoaster ride of learning anatomy, physiology, pathology, diagnosis, and treatment. At first glance, the journey seems to leave little room for anything else. Along the way, we also often hear about cultivating behavioral decorum and social intelligence as soon as our third year clinical rotations begin, or possibly even sooner.

Gary Shlifer

How the Institutionalization of Medicine Has Destroyed the Doctor-Patient Relationship, by Gary Shlifer, DO

As I reach the conclusion of an over decade-long training process to become an internal medicine physician I find myself facing a dilemma I really did not expect. Yet while my training has prepared me to care for the sickest patients, I really don’t understand how to get paid for my work. The long and complicated medical training process does little to prepare young physicians for real world practice where a plethora of insurance, billing, documentation, and pharmaceutical companies prey on naive young physicians.

dr chiweshe

MedSchool Financials: Transportation, by Joseph Chiweshe, MD, MPH

On the journey to become a physician, your education will take you to a lot of different places, both geographically and developmentally. Throughout this process, the cost of transportation is an important and worthwhile factor to monitor. Transportation can become a large a part of your budget; however, there are several things you can do and steps you can take to keep it well within your budget during the time spent in medical school and beyond.

Jarna Shah Jarna Shah (4 Posts)

Editor Emeritus: Former Medical Student Editor (2013-2015) and Physician Guest Writer

University of Illinois College of Medicine

Jarna Shah is an first year anesthesiology resident at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is interested in the development of medical education and healthcare. She is the Co-Editor-in-Chief of in-House (, a sister publication of in-Training. In her free time, she bakes ridiculous desserts, practices martial arts, and writes novels every November.