Tag: clinical competency

Brian James Brian James (10 Posts)

Former Managing Editor and Contributing Writer

University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine


Currently, Brian is a fourth-year medical student at the University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine. He was born in Westchester County, NY, and moved to Laguna Beach, CA in 2007. He graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Pharmacology and a Bachelor of Science in Biopsychology from the University of California, Santa Barbara in 2017. Brian is planning on becoming an OB/GYN and is currently interested in Surgical Oncology. Outside of the classroom, Brian enjoys playing racquetball, reading on personal finance and nutrition, and enjoying outdoor activities at the beach and hiking.




The Fallacy of Shared Decision-Making

I took a quick trip to Target a month ago and browsed for new jeans. I approached the clothing section and was suddenly struck by the overwhelming challenge I had undertaken. From rack to rack, I had to choose from a multitude of different brands (Levis, Wrangler, True Religion and more), different styles (skinny, bootcut, tapered and more) and different colors (blue, black, tan and more). I had to figure out my current exact size …

In Our Assessments We Trust

To understand the issue surrounding assessments, we must understand that it has become increasingly challenging to train physicians suited to face contemporary changes. To future physicians who have access to a repository of ever-expanding information on their smartphones, being tested on ‘high-yield’ minutia serves little purpose. Being able to think critically (and perhaps even imaginatively) in order to make sense of that information for patient care is what counts. And thus, no matter how standardized an examination is, lack of contextual reference renders it futile.

Lived experience

Becoming More Emotionally Intelligent, Adaptive Physician-Leaders

Current evidence suggests that much of human health is influenced more significantly by contextual factors like the social determinants of health than the direct receipt of health care. This relatively new understanding has challenged the notion of “physicianhood” and what it means to improve the health of entire populations and communities. With the influx of issues that the pandemic has brought with it, this new model for being a highly effective physician has become even more important.

Pattern Recognition

Although I’ve spent only a mere two and a half years as a student in this world of medical education, it’s readily apparent that I fit into very few of the “typical medical student” patterns. I’m part of a small cohort of dual degree students. I’m nontraditional, having never considered becoming a physician until after I graduated from college in 2013. And I am a disabled woman.

Shifting Perceptions: Lessons Learned from a Student-Run Clinic

Each time we came in for our Islamic Medical Association of North America (IMANA) Medical Clinic, we never knew what to expect. IMANA clinic is a community-based project led by the Albany Medical College Family Medicine Office that connects medical students to the local Muslim population through screening and education clinics at Masjid As-Salaam. This masjid is the central prayer space and community support for many of Albany’s Muslims. The unique quality of this service-learning program is its emphasis on cultural competency and understanding the role of spirituality in medical care.

Disability and Medicine: We Can All Do Better

Imagine you are a 45-year-old female patient with a significant physical disability that requires the use of a wheelchair for mobility. Thankfully, you have Medicaid insurance, but it is difficult to find primary care providers who will accept it. The paratransit service that you rely on to get to your medical appointments is wildly inconsistent, often forcing you to cancel. When you do make it to your doctor’s office, you are not able to be …

Jeffrey Mahlum Jeffrey Mahlum (2 Posts)

Contributing Writer

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health


My name is Jeff Mahlum, and I am a contributing writer for in-Training magazine. I am a Class of 2018 medical student at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. I also completed my undergraduate degree in Biology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. I took a year off between undergraduate studies and medical school to complete a graduate certificate in Patient Health Advocacy. As someone with a physical disability, I have a particular interest in health disparities and access to care for patients with disabilities.