Tag: anatomy

Rachel Eisenberg (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Albany Medical College


Rachel Eisenberg is a first year medical student at Albany Medical College in Albany, NY class of 2025. In 2021, she graduated from Union College with a Bachelor of Science in biology and history along with a Masters in Business Administration in Healthcare Management from Clarkson University. She enjoys drawing, hiking, and baking in her free time. After graduating medical school, Rachel would like to pursue a career in pediatric radiation oncology.




My Shiny, Black Heart

I made this heart in an undergraduate sculpture class, dreaming of the day I would finally don my own white coat. A year later, it now sits on my desk in the exact line of sight I take each day as I peer above my computer screen, with my stethoscope draped around the base and my Gray’s Anatomy book perched next to it.

Dissecting Anatomy Lab: The Assembly of a Medical Student

In the golden glow of a fall day, 104 first-year medical students parade out of the medical center carrying boxes of bones to aide our anatomy lab studies. The crates look suspiciously like instrument cases, perhaps the size of an alto saxophone, and it feels absurd to march back to our houses a la The Music Man, knowing all the while that we are bringing real live (well, dead) human skeletons into our living rooms, kitchens and coat closets.

Dissecting Anatomy Lab: Introduction

Over the next four weeks, I will share a series of essays with you in which I tell some of those stories. This writing results from the work of a summer, supported by a summer research fellowship in Medical Humanities & Bioethics at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, in which I interviewed nine first-year medical students, two third-year medical students, eight anatomy and medical humanities professors, two Anatomical Gift Program staff, three palliative care clinicians, two preregistered donors and one donor’s family member.

Life in a Line

Many honor their cadaver with the designation of being their “first patient.” Yet, the term “patient” implies the receipt of some benefit in the form of treatment or improved well-being. Throughout our time together, I treated my cadaver with nothing but careful and thoughtful desecration. Just several months earlier I had promised to do no harm. Yet, as my inexperienced hands repeatedly sliced through layers of tissue, I could not help but feel like an intruder stealing something that was never meant to be mine.

Eileen Wang Eileen Wang (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai


Eileen is first year medical student at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Before entering medical school, she studied global health and medical anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania and did a Fulbright research fellowship in Hangzhou, China. Her research interests revolve around exploring issues of maternal-child health and reproductive rights. She enjoys reading, yoga, jogging in Central Park, and autumn weather.