Tag: mental health

May Chammaa May Chammaa (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Wayne State University School of Medicine


May Chammaa is a third year medical student at Wayne State University School of Medicine in Detroit, MI, class of 2022. In 2018, she graduated from Wayne State University with a Bachelor of Arts in philosophy. Her interests include trauma psychiatry, addiction medicine, women’s health, advocacy efforts and dance.




Medical Students Do Not Owe You Their Trauma

Interviewers who ask these questions in a professional setting typically consider these issues to be academic — purely topics for discussion that might provide useful insight into the way the applicant views the world. But for applicants who have been affected, these issues are not merely academic and their discussion can invoke significant emotional turmoil. So before we continue to tacitly accept this shift in interviewing, it is important to consider its purpose and impact on those being interviewed.

Social Distancing Versus Social Isolation

The same four walls surround us for hours on end while we try to marry the responsibilities of medical education with those of social distancing. While these new restrictions may at first seem conducive to much desired additional study time, gym closures and social gathering restrictions only deepen the isolation already felt by so many medical students.

Medical Ethics in the Time of COVID-19: A Call for Critical Reflection

At this very moment, our medical care providers are acting as the heroes we know them to be. They should be celebrated for their steadfast courage and dedication to the community’s safety and wellbeing. Our job as medical students is to support those brave practitioners in the way that most protects their safety and the safety of their patients, which very well could mean (and probably does mean) staying home.

Lived experience

Flourishing and the Well-Lived Life: The Differential Impact of Hedonia and Eudaimonia on Our Experiences

What does it mean to lead a meaningful or purposeful life? One common feature that appears in many cultures is the pursuit and attainment of happiness throughout life. Recent research has unearthed predominant patterns in happiness, and consequently, two major perspectives have emerged: hedonia and eudaimonia.

Madeline Fryer (2 Posts)

Contributing Writer

University of Massachusetts Medical School


Madeline is a member of the Class of 2021 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. She received her BA in Public Health Studies from Johns Hopkins University in 2014 and MMSc in Immunology from Harvard Medical School in 2017. Her primary literary interest is short narratives, and she enjoys being outside and sending snail mail in her free time.