Tag: mental health

Britt D.K. Gratreak Britt D.K. Gratreak (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson


Brittany D.K. Gratreak is a second year MD/PhD student at the University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson. She began college at Portland Community College, then graduated from Portland State University in 2016 with a Bachelor of Science in biology. She is an active leader in women's medical professional groups and dedicated to creating mentorship opportunities for fellow first-generation and low income (FGLI) premedical students. In her spare time, she enjoys cycling, strategy games, and creating art. After graduating medical school, Britt wants to revolutionize the care of patients with traumatic brain injury through neurology and neuroscience.




Navigating Trauma in Your Personal Statement for Medical School

I applied to medical school twice. In retrospect, I was unsuccessful the first time for a few reasons: my timing was terrible, I had too much humility about my achievements and I didn’t ask for enough opinions about my application from people who were rooting for me. My trauma was also too raw and recent to write in a way for strangers to understand.

Medical Students Do Not Owe You Their Trauma

Interviewers who ask these questions in a professional setting typically consider these issues to be academic — purely topics for discussion that might provide useful insight into the way the applicant views the world. But for applicants who have been affected, these issues are not merely academic and their discussion can invoke significant emotional turmoil. So before we continue to tacitly accept this shift in interviewing, it is important to consider its purpose and impact on those being interviewed.

Social Distancing Versus Social Isolation

The same four walls surround us for hours on end while we try to marry the responsibilities of medical education with those of social distancing. While these new restrictions may at first seem conducive to much desired additional study time, gym closures and social gathering restrictions only deepen the isolation already felt by so many medical students.

Medical Ethics in the Time of COVID-19: A Call for Critical Reflection

At this very moment, our medical care providers are acting as the heroes we know them to be. They should be celebrated for their steadfast courage and dedication to the community’s safety and wellbeing. Our job as medical students is to support those brave practitioners in the way that most protects their safety and the safety of their patients, which very well could mean (and probably does mean) staying home.

Lived experience

Flourishing and the Well-Lived Life: The Differential Impact of Hedonia and Eudaimonia on Our Experiences

What does it mean to lead a meaningful or purposeful life? One common feature that appears in many cultures is the pursuit and attainment of happiness throughout life. Recent research has unearthed predominant patterns in happiness, and consequently, two major perspectives have emerged: hedonia and eudaimonia.

Courtney Cosby (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Saint Louis University School of Medicine


Courtney is a second year medical student at Saint Louis University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO class of 2022. In 2015, she graduated from DePauw University with a Bachelor of Arts in history, minor in psychology. She is a jazz music fanatic from Memphis, TN who also enjoys road trips, "good eats," and playing the bass clarinet in her free time. After graduating medical school, Courtney would like to pursue a career in either child and adolescent psychiatry or pediatric rheumatology.