Tag: underrepresented in medicine

Nat Mulkey Nat Mulkey (3 Posts)

Writer-in-Training

Boston University School of Medicine


Nat is a fourth-year medical student at Boston University School of Medicine in Boston Massachusetts, class of 2021. In 2017 they graduated from Hendrix College with a Bachelor of Arts in psychology. They will be applying into psychiatry this year and are currently interested in becoming a child and adolescent psychiatrist. Besides writing, in their free time they enjoy skateboarding, traveling, and trail running.




Misgendering in Medicine: How to Improve Care of Transgender and Gender Non-Binary Patients

It is not uncommon for transgender and gender non-binary individuals to be misgendered by health care providers or in the health care setting. This negatively affects their health and their relationship with their providers. Leaders in the field of transgender and non-binary health care recommend asking about a person’s pronouns and integrating pronoun introductions into the clinical setting.

In Color Cover Photo

Creating Community: A Conversation with Megha Patel, the first Multicultural Coordinator at CMED

After our conversation, I’ve been thinking a lot about creating community. As students of color, especially in areas with low diversity, we create our communities of allies with other students of color or students who are open-minded and willing to learn. For students who come from places with established diversity, the transition to creating communities of their own can be a challenge.

Pattern Recognition

Although I’ve spent only a mere two and a half years as a student in this world of medical education, it’s readily apparent that I fit into very few of the “typical medical student” patterns. I’m part of a small cohort of dual degree students. I’m nontraditional, having never considered becoming a physician until after I graduated from college in 2013. And I am a disabled woman.

In Color Cover Photo

Brown

In college at the University of Michigan, I struggled to find the right place for my blended identity. I felt like the students involved in Indian identity groups were judgmental of those students who did not fit their specific idea of what it meant to be Indian. A friend at the time who was involved in one of those groups would refer to me as an “Oreo” — brown on the outside and white on the inside — for not watching Bollywood movies.

Ana Meza Rochin Ana Meza Rochin (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix


Ana Meza-Rochin is a fourth-year medical student at the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix. She is an immigrant from Mexico who moved to the United States in high school. She obtained her Bachelor in Science in health sciences from Arizona State University. She is interested in surgery with a specific interest in plastic and reconstructive surgery with an emphasis on global health. In her free time, Ana enjoys traveling and spending time with family.