Preclinical

Ashten Duncan Ashten Duncan (2 Posts)

Managing Editor

OU-TU School of Community Medicine


Ashten Duncan is a second-year medical student at the OU-TU School of Community Medicine located in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma, where he completed a B.S. in Microbiology alongside a minor in Chemistry and in French. An aspiring family physician, Ashten is currently on a National Health Service Corps (NHSC) scholarship, which entails a 4-year term of service in an underserved community following residency training in primary care. He is planning to pursue a MPH degree between his 2nd year and 3rd year of medical school, with the intention of applying the public health knowledge to his future practice.




Learning The Textbook Case

Staring at each high-yield line in First Aid, attempting to commit every word to memory, hour-upon-hour, is the life of a medical student. The stress, isolation and over-caffeination, amidst the constant influx of information, is overwhelming and can cause even the most compassionate student to forget why they are studying.

Paying it Forward: Top 5 Takeaways from Medical School So Far

Earlier this month, I watched my younger sister begin her medical school journey as she walked on stage in front of family members and peers to be officially “white-coated.” I had never been to another white coat ceremony since my own years ago. It was fascinating to observe it from my now-more-seasoned fourth-year medical student eyes — especially at another institution.

Moment of Connection

Law, medicine, and dentistry — these were the careers that I was constantly exposed to at home. With my father as a practicing lawyer for over 25 years, two of my siblings already qualified as doctors, and the third on course to completing his medical journey, most of my relatives and friends thought medicine or law would be my choice naturally.

Differentials

“From now on,” our deans told us at orientation, “society will see you as a doctor. Sometimes you may not feel like one, but that is what you are becoming. This week marks the beginning of that transition, which will continue in the months and years to come.”

What Does It Mean Now?

And what does it mean now? To be accepted? To be initiated, congratulated and nudged toward a curriculum made jokingly infamous by well-meaning administrators and by a culture which treats such consuming endeavors as medical school like abstract forms of busyness?