Tag: death and dying

Gabriel Davis Gabriel Davis (4 Posts)

Medical Student Editor and Contributing Writer

SUNY Downstate College of Medicine


Gabe is a third year medical student at the State University of New York (SUNY) Downstate College of Medicine in Brooklyn, New York. In 2017, he graduated from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri with a Bachelor of Arts in English. Gabe is interested in the power of creative and reflective writing for both patients and providers, and in his free time, he enjoys reading, writing, struggling to learn guitar, and exploring Brooklyn. After he graduates medical school, Gabe hopes to pursue a residency in psychiatry and eventually become a clinical educator.




The Anatomy Lesson

There were seven of us standing around the table as the attending surgeon debrided the infected fascia. The vascular surgeon came in the room and barked at us to identify the structures before us. “What’s that artery?” he interrogated us. “I’ll give you a hint,” he said, “there’s a deep and a superficial.” We named the sural nerve and iliotibialis band and the great saphenous vein. As we clamored around the table, I suddenly thought of the Rembrandt painting: The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Nicolaes Tulp.

The Mother of All Preventative Medicine — Anti-Aging: A Review of “Lifespan” by David Sinclair

The incidence of chronic disease is strongly correlated with aging. According to the Information Theory of Aging, aging results from a progressive loss of genetic material due to gradually worsening cellular repair mechanisms. This cellular erosion leads to a nearly interminable list of diseases, including but certainly not limited to cancer, heart disease and neurodegenerative disease.

Allow Natural Death

Allowing natural death gives the elderly and terminally ill the opportunity to control the end of their life, providing empowerment and a sense of peace during their time of uncertainty. This patient and her family’s forethought allowed us to provide medications to ease her pain and discomfort. When she closed her eyes for the last time, her body relaxed into the sheets, and I pulled the blanket up to her shoulders. Her family said goodbye, and then I began to perform post-mortem care.

Dust to Dust

“There’s a great neuro exam in room 5147,” my resident said as I dropped my bag in the call room. “Why don’t you go check it out?” I clutched my reflex hammer in one hand and googled the components of a neuro exam with the other as I headed towards the stairwell.

Taylor Thurston, MHA (1 Posts)

Guest Clinical Research Writer

Radford University


Taylor Thurston is a second year Doctor of Health Science student at Radford University in Radford, Virginia, class of 2020. In 2017, he graduated from Jefferson College of Health Sciences with a Master of Healthcare Administration; prior to that he graduated from Old Dominion University with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology. Taylor is currently employed by Vanderbilt University Medical Center as a Clinical Research Educator. In his free time he enjoys spending time with his family, a wife and one year old son, as well as renovating their home. After graduating Taylor would like to pursue a career in education.