Tag: health care economics

Faiz Saulat Faiz Saulat (2 Posts)

Columnist

Medical College of Georgia


Faiz is a second-year medical student at the Medical College of Georgia in Athens, Georgia class of 2023. In 2018 he graduated from the University of Georgia with a Bachelor of Science in biology. In his free time he enjoys reading poetry from his native language, Urdu, and working out. After completing his training, Faiz aspires to serve with Doctors Without Borders as both a journalist and physician with an interest in caring for victims of political conflict.

Forgotten Roots: Rediscovering Humanity in Medicine

Medicine has advanced in many ways except the ones that count the most. The following column invites you to question whether physicians still hold true to values of altruism, compassion, and humanity. We will explore the patient-provider relationship, the causes of distrust, disparities in medicine, and improvements in medical practice and education.




Course Correction: Growing Distrust in Physicians and Looking Ahead

As we seek to understand this phenomenon, there are many subjective variables that contribute to the trust between patients and providers. Measuring trust in a reliable and consistent fashion is challenging in itself. With these limitations in mind, three salient factors are involved in the decline of patient trust in physicians: one, a commodified healthcare system; two, lack of quality time spent with the patient; and three, racial influences on the patient-provider relationship.

We Have a Cost Crisis in Medicine. What Can Medical Students Do To Help?

There is a cost crisis in medicine: the health care industry accounts for about 18 percent of the GDP in the United States, and predictive models see this increasing in the coming years. This is a problem for the country as a whole as an estimated 41 percent of working Americans have some level of medical debt. 

What Do Medical Students Need to Know About Inner City Poverty?

As many urban academic medical centers have become the world’s leaders in research and patient care, their bordering neighborhoods have suffered through decades of disinvestment and economic blight. Medical students often receive their first years of training in hospitals that serve these disadvantaged populations. While the current focus on social determinants of health represents a rising cornerstone of medical education, what else do medical students need to know about inner city poverty?

How Jimmy Kimmel Failed His Own Test

On May 12, late-night personality Jimmy Kimmel gave a now famous emotional monologue about his newborn son’s health complications, concluding with a politicized message against Trump’s budget and health care reforms. Although Kimmel avoided directly implicating Republicans or Trump, he delivered his “heartfelt plea” immediately following the approval of the Republican American Health Care Act (AHCA), making it obvious whom Kimmel was really addressing.

Clinton v. Trump: Health Care Proposals

With the 2016 presidential election just days away, debates on the personalities and as well as the policy agendas of the respective candidates have become increasingly fierce. Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton may both be moderates at heart, but their official policy platforms represent near-extremes of the political spectrum. This holds especially true in their proposals regarding healthcare: Trump’s proposal, entitled “Health Care Reform to Make America Great Again,” and Clinton’s, “Universal, Quality, Affordable Health Care for Everyone in America” together paint a picture of the spectrum of opinions and debates surrounding healthcare.

Talia Robledo-Gil (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Yale School of Medicine


Talia is originally from Miami Beach, Florida, born to parents who emigrated from Peru. She attended Dartmouth College, where she majored in Art History and minored in Biology. After spending a year working to help develop partnership between Dartmouth and various institutions in Peru, Talia then started medical school at Yale. She plans to pursue a residency in internal medicine, and hopes to work with underserved populations, particularly the Latino community. She hopes to achieve this by engaging in clinical practice, educating medical trainees, and advancing healthcare policy.