Tech

Kaitlyn Dykes Kaitlyn Dykes (4 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Sidney Kimmel Medical College Thomas Jefferson University


Kaitlyn Dykes is a 3rd year medical student at Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University. Her writing and art focus on aspects of delivering patient-centered care, the experience of medical training, and helping fellow students develop into aware, compassionate physicians. She is President of Physician Executive Leadership (PEL), a program committed to aiding students in becoming physician healthcare leaders of the future by addressing critical gaps in medical education. She is also dedicated to and actively involved in clinical translational research. She graduated with honors in 2011 from the University of Minnesota with a degree in genetics, cell biology, and cell development, along with a minor in art history, and fulfillment of the Dean's Scholars Leadership Program.




The Egg Drop Project & Inspiration

Do you remember the classic high school physics project where you were tasked with designing a contraption that would protect an uncooked egg from a high fall? At first, this task may have seemed daunting and maybe even impossible, but with a little inspiration, persistence and learning from several scrambled eggs, you likely achieved success.

Different Strokes for Different Folks: Acute Care in the Age of Telemedicine

“Telestroke,” a telemedicine approach to acute stroke care, is revolutionizing how we treat our country’s third leading cause of death. Leveraging modern communication technology and the combined experience of skilled neurologists, Telestroke aims to benefit patients in rural areas who are often at the highest risk of ischemic stroke but have the least access to treatment.

Health IT: A New Nexus for Health Care and Social Services

Visits to Chicago usually include exploring attractions like the Willis Tower and Cloud Gate (“the Bean”). However, a lesser visited destination, The Hull House maybe the most important site for those of us in the medical field. A turn of the century settlement house, this museum is a reminder of how an integrated model of delivering social services and health care impacted the entire nation.

What’s the First Thing You Do When You Walk Into a Patient’s Room?

I was constantly sick as a child with ear infections, meaning I was in the doctor’s office all of the time. However, about the time I turned 3 years old, I got Bell’s palsy. My mom is a nurse and did not often overreact to medical issues, but she was obviously terrified of my drooping face and rushed me into the doctor’s office. Given my previous history of visits for my ear infections, the doctor was somewhat impatient. Assuming I was there for another ear infection, he walked into the room while looking at my chart, never looking up. As he was prattling on about how we were in the office far too often my mom looked at him and yelled, “Just look at her!” The moment he did, his jaw dropped and he rushed into action.

Disruptive Health Care Technology in Medical Education

Reform. Disrupt. Innovate. These words are undeniably components of today’s medical vernacular and as medical students we are positioned in the middle of a dynamic health care landscape. The past few years have set forth a unique training phase for aspiring physicians. Medicine is evolving; not only from a legislative perspective, but also through a continually stronger relationship with technology that is driving human understanding into previously incomprehensible territory.

New Prosthesis Allows Amputees to Feel Again

Could you taste without a tongue? Smell without a nose? Feel without any hands? The answer may soon be yes. Scientists in Europe have just created a prosthetic limb that allows amputees to feel again. Prosthetics have come a long way. The earliest written record of prosthetics being used dates back to well over 2000 years ago when a prisoner without a leg used a wooden stump. In the 1500s, Ambroise Pare, a French surgeon, …

Medical Students as Leaders in Biotech Research: Interview with Cardiac Imaging Innovator Nabeel Ali

It’s not often that a medical student gets to lead a research project. It’s even more uncommon to see physicians-in-training solving complex problems in the fields of biotech and medical technology. That is, until you’ve met Nabeel Ali. Nabeel, a second-year medical student at Albany Medical College, paved a singular path to medical school. Starting as an electrical engineering major at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, he switched to biomedical engineering to pursue medicine. Just a few …

Ajay Major, MD, MBA Ajay Major, MD, MBA (12 Posts)

Founder and Editor-in-Chief Emeritus

University of Colorado School of Medicine

My name is Ajay Major, a Class of 2016 graduate of Albany Medical College and an internal medicine resident at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

My journey into medical journalism and publishing began in April 2012 when I founded in-Training, the online magazine for medical students, and served as editor-in-chief for four years. I also founded in-House, the online magazine for residents and fellows, and The Palate, an online magazine for medical students at the intersection of nutrition and public health.

To support these publications, I founded Pager Publications, Inc., a 501c3 non-profit literary corporation that curates and supports peer-edited publications for the medical education community. In May 2016, Pager Publications, Inc. published its first print book: in-Training: Stories from Tomorrow's Physicians, a print compendium of over 100 articles written and edited by medical students on humanism, our real-life patients, and the challenges of being a physician-in-training

I am also a lover of all things science fiction and fantasy (Star Trek: Voyager is my favorite -- apologies to all you Picard fans), and I play classical piano and clarinet.