Emily DiLillo Emily DiLillo (2 Posts)

Contributing Writer

University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine

Emily is a medical student at the University of Illinois at Chicago in the Class of 2019. Born and raised in the suburbs of Chicago, she eventually went on to become a Hawkeye, and graduated from the University of Iowa in 2014 with a degree in Human Physiology. In her free time, she enjoys reading, swimming, doing puzzles, and most of all, sleeping.

What’s the First Thing You Do When You Walk Into a Patient’s Room?

I was constantly sick as a child with ear infections, meaning I was in the doctor’s office all of the time. However, about the time I turned 3 years old, I got Bell’s palsy. My mom is a nurse and did not often overreact to medical issues, but she was obviously terrified of my drooping face and rushed me into the doctor’s office. Given my previous history of visits for my ear infections, the doctor was somewhat impatient. Assuming I was there for another ear infection, he walked into the room while looking at my chart, never looking up. As he was prattling on about how we were in the office far too often my mom looked at him and yelled, “Just look at her!” The moment he did, his jaw dropped and he rushed into action.

Healthcare Tech

Disruptive Health Care Technology in Medical Education

Reform. Disrupt. Innovate. These words are undeniably components of today’s medical vernacular and as medical students we are positioned in the middle of a dynamic health care landscape. The past few years have set forth a unique training phase for aspiring physicians. Medicine is evolving; not only from a legislative perspective, but also through a continually stronger relationship with technology that is driving human understanding into previously incomprehensible territory.


Surgical Residents Advised to Play Video Games

Video games, which have been linked to childhood obesity, aggression and poor school performance, are currently being used in the training of surgical residents. Most of the reported effects of video games in the media appear to center upon the alleged negative consequences: video game addiction, increased aggressiveness and various medical and psychosocial effects.

New Prosthesis Allows Amputees to Feel Again

Could you taste without a tongue? Smell without a nose? Feel without any hands? The answer may soon be yes. Scientists in Europe have just created a prosthetic limb that allows amputees to feel again. Prosthetics have come a long way. The earliest written record of prosthetics being used dates back to well over 2000 years ago when a prisoner without a leg used a wooden stump. In the 1500s, Ambroise Pare, a French surgeon, …

Nabeel Ali, research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Medical Students as Leaders in Biotech Research: Interview with Cardiac Imaging Innovator Nabeel Ali

It’s not often that a medical student gets to lead a research project. It’s even more uncommon to see physicians-in-training solving complex problems in the fields of biotech and medical technology. That is, until you’ve met Nabeel Ali. Nabeel, a second-year medical student at Albany Medical College, paved a singular path to medical school. Starting as an electrical engineering major at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, he switched to biomedical engineering to pursue medicine. Just a few …


I Am Present: Medical School in the Digital Age

At any given moment in this hyper-connected era, we are beckoned by our smartphones, iPods, iPads and laptops to participate in the multiple spheres in which we exist.  These “spheres” — our physical surroundings, families and friends, social media, blogs, e-mail — are simultaneously concrete and confabulated, yet they equally contribute to our identity.  Navigating these arenas enriches and edifies our current existence with memories of old friendships and ever-increasing networks of new contacts while …


Baseball, Blue Buttons, and Legitimately Beautiful Health Records: An Interview with Adam Wong at the ONC for Health IT

Adam Wong works at the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, all of which, thankfully, can be abbreviated: ONC for Health IT.  The development of health IT — which includes everything from electronic medical records to smartphone apps — is at its best a populist project, involving techies, patients, students and health care professionals. I spoke with Adam about some of the recent developments in health IT and how medical students can …

Doctor versus Algorithm: Which Would You Trust?

Next generation medical robotics If your doctor and an algorithm arrived at two different diagnoses, which would you trust?  Of course, it depends on the specific context but this question opens a much needed discussion about a transformative process occurring in medicine: computers are beginning to perform tasks of physicians.  While modern medicine utilizes medical technology primarily as an aid for physicians, future technology may afford diagnostic capability that rivals that of humans. The question …

MERCI Device: Revolutionary Treatment of Acute Stroke

Introduction to mechanical thrombectomy The progress of clinical medicine lies within the purview of translational research, for if change is constant through time, then normalcy is backwardness. Dr. Y. Pierre Gobin of Weill Cornell Medical College understood this axiom in 1995 when he began developing the first mechanical thrombectomy device, now FDA-approved, for treatment of acute stroke. The model for stroke treatment remains at the mercy of time. Acute stroke is a heart attack of …

Vereos PET/CT, introduced by Phillips Healthcare at RSNA 2013.

New Innovations in Medical Imaging Technology: Live from RSNA

The Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting convened in Chicago this year with over 60,000 attendees. Yes, sixty thousand attendees. Physicians and medical students of all clinical specialties were joined by technologists, scientists, engineers, researchers, business personnel and many other professionals to network, enhance their educations, hone clinical skills and share cutting-edge research. A major hallmark of the RSNA conference is participation by the imaging technology industry. Diagnostic radiology and the imaging industry …

Nabeel U. Ali Nabeel U. Ali (2 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Albany Medical College

Nabeel is a medical student at Albany Medical College in the Class of 2017; he is focused on impacting healthcare through innovative research and technology.