Tag: health care reform

Kasopefoluwa Oguntuyo (2 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai


Sope Oguntuyo is a 2nd year MD/PhD candidate at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Before matriculating into the MSTP, Sope was a Biology Major with Chemistry and History Minors at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. His interests include translational biomedical research, global medicine/science, soccer, rock climbing, and reading.




Welcome to the Future of (Affordable) Care

On a late March day in 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Affordable Care Act into law. For many Americans, it was a day of celebration as they would finally be able to get the healthcare they needed at a price they could afford. For others it was a day of frustration and confusion, because even from the beginning it was apparent that this plan was not perfect. Over the past six years we have watched the success and failures of the bill as it was slowly put into action. In that time more than 20 million people have gained health insurance.

Health IT: A New Nexus for Health Care and Social Services

Visits to Chicago usually include exploring attractions like the Willis Tower and Cloud Gate (“the Bean”). However, a lesser visited destination, The Hull House maybe the most important site for those of us in the medical field. A turn of the century settlement house, this museum is a reminder of how an integrated model of delivering social services and health care impacted the entire nation.

The Top Ten Moments of 2016 in the Fight for Universal Health Care

Debate about some of the most pressing issues facing our country were lost in the horse race of the 2016 presidential campaign. Among those issues was healthcare. While millions of Americans received health coverage under the Affordable Care Act, an estimated 30 million remain uninsured and medical bills continue to be the leading cause of bankruptcy in the United States.

Patient Advocacy in Trump’s America

It’s been a hard week. Hard, of course, because this election has caused an unprecedented wave of fear across our nation. Hard because those whose lives have been invalidated by our newest president elect are already exhausted by the daily struggle of living in a hostile country. And — not to be discounted — hard because bad days in medical school seem to hunt in packs and pounce all at once.

Clinton v. Trump: Health Care Proposals

With the 2016 presidential election just days away, debates on the personalities and as well as the policy agendas of the respective candidates have become increasingly fierce. Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton may both be moderates at heart, but their official policy platforms represent near-extremes of the political spectrum. This holds especially true in their proposals regarding healthcare: Trump’s proposal, entitled “Health Care Reform to Make America Great Again,” and Clinton’s, “Universal, Quality, Affordable Health Care for Everyone in America” together paint a picture of the spectrum of opinions and debates surrounding healthcare.

How the Institutionalization of Medicine Has Destroyed the Doctor-Patient Relationship, by Gary Shlifer, DO

As I reach the conclusion of an over decade-long training process to become an internal medicine physician I find myself facing a dilemma I really did not expect. Yet while my training has prepared me to care for the sickest patients, I really don’t understand how to get paid for my work. The long and complicated medical training process does little to prepare young physicians for real world practice where a plethora of insurance, billing, documentation, and pharmaceutical companies prey on naive young physicians.

Not Safe, Not Fair: The UK Junior Doctor Contract Dispute

In the UK, there is currently a dispute over the new junior doctor contract. “Junior doctors” are defined as anyone in training and who is not a consultant. Many have deemed the new contract neither safe nor fair, and despite doctors striking, the Department of Health are intending to impose this contract in August 2016. On April 26, there will be a 48-hour full strike including emergency care — the first of its kind in the history of the National Health Services (NHS) — in the hope that the government will change their mind.

Alisha Burman Alisha Burman (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer Emeritus

University of Cambridge


Alisha is a medical student at the University of Cambridge and is currently doing her intercalated degree in Genetics. When not in the library, she can be found putting on events as Welfare Officer for her MedVetSoc, raising awareness about mental health and fixing the "broken bones" of soft toys in Teddy Bear Hospital.