Tag: health disparities

John Damianos John Damianos (2 Posts)

Writer-in-Training

Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine


John Damianos graduated from Dartmouth College in 2016, majoring in linguistics modified with neuroscience and minoring in French. While at Dartmouth, he did a lot of work in substance abuse counseling, and became interested in behavior change through tools like Motivational Interviewing. He is now a member of the class of 2020 at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine. He is a Medical Education Scholar and completed a Pano T. Rodis Fellowship in Compassionate Medical Care. Greek by heritage and a linguist by training, he particularly enjoys anatomy and dissecting not only the body but also the names of structures therein.




Stepping Beyond the Border: Reflections of a Medical Student on an International Elective Experience

Outside apartment 13C the street is empty. It is early in the morning, and yet sounds echo from the metal shop beside the lake, roosters crow, and the children upstairs patter back and forth across the tiles. I roll up my yoga mat, shaking dead cockroaches from its rubbery bottom. Through the grated windows I catch a glimpse of Lake Victoria, shimmering out from the cluttered shore of shanties and deconstructed docks to eventually blend with the blue of the morning sky.

Medicine Has a Problem with Racism

With the future of the Affordable Care Act uncertain under President Trump, many Americans are left worrying how they will manage without health care. The Americans who must shoulder this burden are disproportionately people of color. It should come as no surprise to those familiar with the history of health care in this country that once again our system, purportedly built to protect and promote health, is systematically ignoring the right to health care for communities of color.

Armide Storey (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Boston University School of Medicine


Armide Storey is medical student at Boston University School of Medicine. She is particularly interested in understanding health as it intersects with class, race, ability, sexuality, and gender.