Tag: health disparities

Frank Qian (2 Posts)

Writer-in-Training

University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine


My name is Frank, and I am a student at University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. As a new medical education intern, I aim to write about potential opportunities for improving our medical education system. In particular, I am interested in exploring ways to incorporate lifestyle medicine into our medical curriculum in order to maximize the achievement of health maintenance and primary prevention of chronic diseases. My future goal is to go into internal medicine with a key focus on preventive medicine and public health. Thank you in advance for reading my work! I welcome any potential comments and criticisms.




Stepping Beyond the Border: Reflections of a Medical Student on an International Elective Experience

Outside apartment 13C the street is empty. It is early in the morning, and yet sounds echo from the metal shop beside the lake, roosters crow, and the children upstairs patter back and forth across the tiles. I roll up my yoga mat, shaking dead cockroaches from its rubbery bottom. Through the grated windows I catch a glimpse of Lake Victoria, shimmering out from the cluttered shore of shanties and deconstructed docks to eventually blend with the blue of the morning sky.

Medicine Has a Problem with Racism

With the future of the Affordable Care Act uncertain under President Trump, many Americans are left worrying how they will manage without health care. The Americans who must shoulder this burden are disproportionately people of color. It should come as no surprise to those familiar with the history of health care in this country that once again our system, purportedly built to protect and promote health, is systematically ignoring the right to health care for communities of color.

Debunking Common Myths Surrounding PTSD: What PTSD Actually Looks Like (Today)

With the increased awareness surrounding mental health that has come over the course of the 21st century, many more people are aware of PTSD. Our understanding of it has come a long way from the earliest accounts of “soldier’s heart” during the Civil War era, or even what was termed “shell shock” during World War 1. However, there are still some common misconceptions surrounding PTSD, which I hope to debunk here.

Jawad Husain Jawad Husain (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Boston University School of Medicine


Jawad Husain is 4th year BU medical student and future addiction psychiatrist. He has worked as a research assistant for the BU Clinical Addiction Research and Education (CARE) Unit on two studies focused on improving clinical outcomes for patients with opioid use disorder. He is also a member of the Student Coalition on Addiction, a group of medical students from all of the Massachusetts medical schools working to advocate for residents with substance use disorders.