Tag: medical humanities

Eshiemomoh Osilama Eshiemomoh Osilama (2 Posts)

Writer-in-Training

Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine


Eshiemomoh Osilama is a second-year medical student at Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine in Scranton, PA class of 2024. He graduated from Columbia University in 2016 with a Bachelor of Arts in biology. He enjoys reading and writing poetry, baking, theater, singing, museums, traveling, beaches and oceans, photography, and being an extraordinary guncle.




Medical Humanities: A Pathway to Patient-Centered Care

To fully capture the breadth of medical humanities is simply not possible. In fact, it is all too easy for the medical community to lack an appreciation for all of the ways that the humanities not only complement, but enhance medicine. Medicine — a field so biological and chemical — is often associated with far more rigidity than where the humanities permits the mind to go.

The Significance of Artistic Observation in Medical Education

Studies have shown that physicians with exposure and background in the humanities are more empathetic, ethical, expressive and even healthier. Recently, medical school curricula across the country have begun to emphasize communication, teamwork, problem solving and humanistic care, as the dichotomous view of the sciences as a separate entity from art and literature is becoming obsolete. 

How Your Neurons Respond to Art

It was 5 p.m. on a Thursday and I had just finished my first preceptorship session with my fourth-year medical student preceptor. That afternoon was one of many firsts, as it was also the first time I conducted a patient interview. My first-ever patient was a middle-aged woman in the emergency room talking to me through Zoom. I remember introducing myself nervously, stuttering on the few syllables that make up my name, and then asking what brought her to the hospital.

Snakes and Symbols: How Medicine Misrepresents Itself

A picture is worth 1,000 words, and the world today is full of symbols. Emojis share paragraphs of information. Logos inform us about what a company represents or does. Shapes and colors share messages of safety or caution on the road. Symbols are everywhere and understanding them brings deeper understanding to the world around us. Medicine is a field of precision, and that is precisely why it is so strange that such confusion exists as to which symbol should represent it.

Why Reading (Still) Matters in Medicine, by John Kim, DO

The road to medical school mostly requires good grades in the hard sciences, high entrance exam scores, volunteering, and other quality extracurricular experiences. Once in medical school, the curriculum is a rollercoaster ride of learning anatomy, physiology, pathology, diagnosis, and treatment. At first glance, the journey seems to leave little room for anything else. Along the way, we also often hear about cultivating behavioral decorum and social intelligence as soon as our third year clinical rotations begin, or possibly even sooner.

John Kim, DO John Kim, DO (1 Posts)

Physician Guest Writer

Larkin Community Hospital Palm Springs Campus


John Kim, DO is currently completing his Family Medicine residency training in Florida. He grew up in and attended medical school in Southern California. John is extremely passionate about teaching current and future doctors how to achieve health and wellness despite their often highly demanding and stressful lives in medicine. In addition to founding Doctors of Steel, he is also a regular contributor for Docs of Tomorrow.