Tag: narrative medicine

Parker Davis Parker Davis (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

University of Texas Southwestern Medical School


Parker is a first-year medical student at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, Texas class of 2025. In 2021, he graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a Bachelor of Science in microbiology. He enjoys playing music, reading, and hiking in his free time. After graduating from medical school, Parker would like to pursue a career in emergency medicine.




The COVID Narrative

Our illness narrative, the COVID narrative, is about so much more than regaining health (though I acknowledge that for those afflicted by the disease, overcoming the debilitating circumstances may be more than can even be hoped for). Returning to Frank’s ideas, our narrative is about rediscovering the voice that was stolen by forces beyond our control.

A Meditation on the Anatomy Lab

This feeling of loss and subsequent reflection revealed to me something fundamental about how I experience time in my own life. As I depart the anatomy lab, I stand on the shores of time’s river and gaze into the clear water’s surface. In it, I see a reflection of growth and of internal transformation — a reflection not of who I was but of who I have become. I emerge not only learned in anatomy but also with insight into the impact that individuals can have on one another.

The Subtle Art of (Not) Reflecting

Another day passed as I approached the deadline of my latest assignment. Our professor asked students rotating in the ICU to reflect and write up a patient encounter that influenced them deeply. In an effort to encourage a more humane and nuanced understanding of medicine, this was part of a series of reflective assignments being introduced in medical schools. While the budding writer in me was delighted at this prospect, the medical student, ironically, was …

cirque

Narrative in Cirque

When I was 17, I went to the gynecologist for a Pap smear because my mom said, “Once you have sex you have to get one.” It felt like punishment, but it was also the only way I had a chance of getting birth control. I went to three different doctors and exam after exam, they kept saying I could have cancer. I did a ‘colpo’ — whatever that is. After that, they did three different procedures on me, THREE, all to take pieces of my cervix. I don’t remember what they were called or what even happened. All I remember is the pain.

#Top12of2020: in-Training 2020 Year in Review

Thank you for your contributions and your readership over the past year. It has certainly been a difficult one, and we are exceedingly grateful that you all used in-Training as a platform to share your reflections, opinions, and solutions. Run by medical students and for medical students, your ongoing support is what makes us a premier online peer-reviewed publication. We look forward to seeing your contributions in 2021, and we’re excited to see where the year takes us (hopefully some place better!).

Strength

She was a woman in her early twenties accompanied by her husband. She was a first-time expecting mother at 19 weeks gestation with twins. They had received regular prenatal care and had been doing everything as the doctor had instructed to ensure a healthy pregnancy. She made this appointment because she felt something was off, her motherly instincts already keen.

Buddy

You were my first patient on my first inpatient rotation as a third-year medical student, which meant that I had absolutely no idea what was going on. I was mostly concerned with trying not to faint during presentations on morning rounds. I stared at your bowl of Cheerios, the cereal beginning to turn the skim milk a pale yellow. Your brow furrowed in annoyance behind your thick glasses.

Chika Nwosu (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine


Chika Nwosu is a fourth year medical student at Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine in Miami, FL, class of 2020. She graduated from Northwestern University with a Bachelor of Arts in psychology, then attended New York University for a post-baccalaureate pre-medical program. She is passionate about Women's Health and is currently advocating for the fight against Human Trafficking, and hopes to continue with it after graduating. When she does have free time, she enjoys dancing, painting and spending time with family and friends.