Tag: coronavirus

Rob Palmer Rob Palmer (1 Posts)

Contributing Writer

Yale School of Medicine


Rob is a fourth-year medical student at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut class of 2021. He graduated from the University of Southern California summa cum laude with a Bachelors of Science in human biology and minors in psychology and entrepreneurship. His research has focused on novel psychological and psychospiritual-pharmacologic treatments for substance use addiction as well as various applications of mindfulness meditation. In his free time, he enjoys playing ultimate frisbee, reading, and writing. After graduating medical school, he would like to pursue a career as a dual-certified psychiatrist and family medicine physician.




Doctors for Democracy: Why Being an Election Worker is Good Public Health

Rather than ask elderly poll workers to risk their health on Election Day, medical professionals and students can volunteer to work at polling locations. Health care professionals and students tend to be in a lower-risk population and are also well-versed in the public health practices critical to safely conducting an election during the pandemic.

Learning in Crisis

How could I study for my next exam instead of focusing my energy on the crisis around me? Was I selfish for still worrying about doing well in school while others died alone in the hospital on a ventilator? In these moments, I found respite in “Learning in War-Time,” a sermon delivered by C.S. Lewis to the students of Oxford in 1939 just as World War II began. In this timely sermon, Lewis addressed the chief concern on students’ minds: Why continue to study philosophy or science “when the lives of our friends and the liberties of Europe are in the balance?”

“I Can’t Be Here Anymore”

Mr. K had been admitted with dehydration and malnutrition secondary to diarrhea in the setting of HIV. During his stay, he developed refeeding syndrome. When the resulting electrolyte imbalances paved the way for cardiac arrhythmias, he coded twice in the ICU. The care team managed to bring him back each time, but not without consequence; the brutality of numerous cycles of CPR left him with multiple rib fractures, inflicting him with sharp pain every breath. 

How a Pandemic Has Shifted the Conversation Around Harm Reduction

For a variety of reasons, the substance use population is particularly vulnerable to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on data from previous financial crises, the emotional toll will increase rates of new substance use, escalate current use, and trigger relapse even among those with long-term abstinence. There may be a significant lag before these changes are detected and treated because health care resources are being funneled toward the pandemic.

Six Feet Apart

One inch more than the measure of me, and one inch less than that of my father. It’s been a while since I lined up, back to back. But if I did, the space between us would only read two inches. Maybe less now that he is older. Nearly sixty. Closer to the next decade than the last.

My Pandemic Journey

Unmotivated to study, I dedicated myself to researching the virus as well as its epidemiological, social and economical impact on our communities. Adjusting to life in quarantine was frustrating, and I felt like I was watching the world turn upside down. However, researching the pandemic felt much more relevant than trying to use all these anatomy apps to fill in gaps created by a lack of practical hands-on learning. 

Jennifer Yoo (2 Posts)

Contributing Writer

UC Riverside School of Medicine


Jennifer is a second year medical student at the UC Riverside School of Medicine. She graduated with an M.S. in Translational Medicine from the University of Helsinki in 2017 and a B.A. in Biochemistry from Smith College in 2014. Her professional interests include global and mental health. She enjoys traveling, reading, and baking during her spare time.